QUODCUMQUE  FACIENDUM : NIMIS  FACIEMUS

Ogof Craig Yr Ffynnon

the latest developments
and details of the new extensions by IAN CALDER.

Following the BCRA Conference
held in Manchester last September, various Belfryites came back mumbling and,
muttering about the new extension in, the fantastic Rock and Fountain system
near ‘Aggy’ -well the B.B. has now got the gen! Thanks to Ian Calder.  He writes
however, “One of the hazards of going to the Annual Dinner is that you can get
conned in to writing something for the B.B.’ and guess what?  I was conned!

At the end of September I was lucky enough to get a trip
into this cave to view and photograph the new extension.  Having dragged ourselves out of bed early on
Saturday the four of us, Clive (Westlake), John, Mark and myself, met John
Parker by the Rock and Fountain, unfortunately he was feeling rough that day so
the four of us took ourselves into the cave without him.  The entrance is certainly small and I had
read very unpleasant stories of this first section, however, it was,
apparently, very dry, and did not go on for as long as I thought it might.  Then came the first Choke, short but loose,
to emerge into a larger passage with some quite good straws and then the Second
Choke.  This appears to be more stable
than the first but is much longer and the way through is to take a devious
upwards spiral – quite an energetic and clever route.  At the top of the Second Choke one emerges
out into a large passage which continues to increase in size culminating in the
Hall of the Mountain King with formations in abundance.  Not having been in the cave before I felt
that the trip was already worth it.  This
is an enormous place (about 100ft square in cross section) and the photographs
of it do not do it justice.  The cave has
some dramatic changes and at the end of the Hall of the Mountain King, perhaps
the most dramatic change takes place, for one crawls through the Third Choke
and on through a further 600ft. of low passage before coming to the ‘Severn:
Tunnel’, a dead straight rift passage going for around 800ft, before leading
into the Fourth Choke.  We noted the ways
off to the Blaen Elin stream and the Lower Series.

Then we tackled the Fourth Choke which led us into a large
passage.  We were now in the new
extension and it was obvious that few people had been there.  The floor has a covering of mud which is in
pristine condition.  We tiptoed on,
hardly daring to leave our inevitable mark. Shortly a junction appeared and we first followed a side passage to a
large chamber.  Across this we passed
some good formations before revealing the most fantastic sight I have ever
seen.  The clusters of helictites at the
end of this passage defy description as well as gravity.  They are so delicate, in some cases
‘hair-like’, and so interwoven that one can only talk in hushed tones, hardly
daring to breath, and marvel at their existence.  I felt very privileged at being able to see
them in this perfect condition.  We all
just hoped that they would never be spoiled. This is going to be a real problem but let’s hope that this passage
decor will not be spoiled by careless intruders.

Back in the large chamber we explored the choke at the end
and then returned to the junction to descend to the streamway which was
dry.  We followed this large passage up
for a few hundred feet until we found a trickle and stopped for a brew and a
bite to eat.  Duly refreshed we continued
to follow this passage for some considerable distance, probably about three
quarters of a mile.  It is generally
large and mainly phreatic except for an oxbow which requires a certain amount
of crawling.  There are many good
formations and plenty of selenite crystals on the walls.  Eventually the passage makes an abrupt right
hand turn before finally closing down to the end crawl.  We found a way on; needless to say that John
Parker has been there before us.  This
way on emerged again into a large passage only to end shortly at the Fifth
Choke and, at the moment, terminal choke.

Now to work with Clive photographing and the rest of us
holding flashes in various strange positions. We made our way back to the brew spot. Clive was using two slave units for the two bulb guns and this was
extremely effective.  Having packed up
our work in the Hall of the Mountain King, we finally emerged from the cave ten
hours after entering it.  It was a superb
trip and a very fine discovery.  We met
John Parker by the cars and adjourned to the Rock and Fountain pub where Clive
photographed the survey.  It is clear
from the survey that the cave travels along one main line of weakness on a
bearing of 320 degrees, deviating from this in only one or two places – along
oxbows and side passages.  At the end it
does turn suddenly to a bearing of 060 degrees before coming to the final
choke.  There must be a connection with
the Llangattock caves somewhere.  Daren
Cilau has been dye tested but the dye emerged in the Clydach sometime later and
was not detected in Craig yr Ffynnon. Does the cave connect with ‘Aggy’? Much speculation seems to be afoot but if it did what a system there
would be under Llangattock!  One thing’s
for certain, the hydrology here is anything but simple and speculation will no
doubt continue until further breakthroughs take place – which they certainly
will.  This new extension has virtually
doubled the length of the cave – it may not be long, before this cave becomes a
very major system indeed.

 

Lifeline

By Tim Large.

A new Club year begins, they seem to come round all too
quickly these days.

From the comments I’ve heard, the Dinner-was enjoyed by
all.  The usual problem at the Caveman of
crowding in the bar before the meal, but then who could cope with 134 people
all clamouring for drinks inside 30 minutes. Your comments and complaints will be welcomed in the, hope that they
will help iron out the problem in the future. Many faces not often seen on Mendip made a pleasant appearance at the
Dinner.  At the Belfry I understand that
‘Jok’ was up to his usual standard of behaviour and had something to do with a
case of burnt shoes – Mr. Nigel must have had cold feet.

The E.G.M. on the new Constitution went well; it was chaired
by ‘Sett’ and some changes to the sub-committees proposal made.  The new constitution will be published with
the B.B. as soon as possible.  The main
changes involve the moving of the Club Year from January back to October;
inclusion of the Trustees – to bring them within the control of the Club at a
General Meeting; chances to the election of Club Officers; the B.B. Editor now
becomes a club officer and the post of Climbing Secretary has been dropped.

The A.G.M., chaired by Alan Thomas, was conducted in record
time.  The B.B. Editor, Hon. Treasurer
and Hon Auditor’s reports for 1977 were formally adopted and a vote of thanks
was given to ‘Alfie’ for his many years of service to the Club.  The question of tackle attracted a lengthy
discussion as much has gone missing – both ropes and ladders.  The A.G.M. passed a resolution that the
Committee exercise more control over the tackle at the same time maintaining
reasonable access.  There was some
concern over outstanding hut fees.  I
suggest that people who owe money pay up quickly or you may find your name
published on a Belfry debtors list!

At the October Committee meeting it was agreed, in
accordance with the A.G.M. resolution regarding tackle to lock the tackle
store, keys being available from Committee members only.  A small amount of tackle will be kept in the
Belfry changing room or immediate use. Should anyone need large amounts of tackle then a Committee member can
be arranged for access to the store.  The
reserve tackle will be stored at Dave Irwin’s house.  In all cases the tackle book must be
completed when taking any tackle out. Besides being a check on, who has what it also gives the tacklemaster an
indication of the life and wear tackle is receiving an important point I think
you would all agree.  At the time of the
A.G.M. £600 worth of tackle was missing and accounted for in the tackle
book.  Since then some has been returned
but somebody must have the rest – please return it!  If tackle is needed for long term projects
such as digs or caving holidays, arrangements must be made with the tackle
master.  At the present time I would
think such arrangements would not be available to members because we are so
short of tackle.  One instance is of
100ft of lifeline that has gone missing from the library – whoever has it
please bring it back.

A provisional booking has been made at the Caveman, Cheddar
for next years Annual Dinner – make a point of the date now.

OCTOBER  6th 1979 –
only 11 months to go!

*****************************************

New members — welcome to the B.E.C.

942 Robin Hayler, 39 Ditching;
Hill,
Southgate West,

Crawley,
Sussex
RH11 8QJ
.
943 Simon Woodman, Link Batch, Burrington, Nr. Bristol BS18 7AU
944 Stephen Plumley,

4 Hickford
Lane
, Burrington, Nr. Bristol BS18 7AU

Change of address;

680 Bob Cross, 1st

Helens Lane
, Adel,
Leeds 16,
West Yorkshire.

SUBS FOR 1979… make ~ note of the change……

As your current sub takes you through to the end of January
1979 the SUB FOR 1979 WILL BE FOR EIGHT MONTHS UP TO THE START OF THE NEXT CLUB
YEAR IN OCTOBER 1979.

An announcement giving subscription rates for next year will
be in the DECEMBER 1978 ‘B.B. DON’T MISS IT!

Publications

Publicatiosn available from Bryan Ellis,

30 Mai Road
, Westonzoyland, Bridgwater,

Somerset,
TA7
0EB
.

7th International Speleological Congress Proceedings

The main publication of the
Congress with 444pp and over 190 papers from the sections on Geology &
Mineralogy, Karts Morphology, Speleogenesis, Hydrogeology, Cave Chemistry &
Physics, Speliobiology, Archaeology and Palaeontology, Documentation,
Techniques & Equipment, Conservation & Tourism.  Price £13.20 including p & p.

Caves And Karst Of

Ireland

The Congress Guidebook to Irish
Speleology, written as a handbook for the excursions from the Congress.  27pp. Price £0.70p.

Caves And Karst Of Southern England And
South
Wales

The Congress Guidebook to Mendip,
Devon, the Cotswolds and
South Wales.  83pp. Price £0.95p.

Caves And Karst Of The
Yorkshire
Dales

The Congress Guidebook to the Dales
area.  37pp. Price £0.80p.

Bibliography Of British Karst

Prepared as an introduction to
Britsh Karst geomorphology, the bibliography covers the period 1960 –
1977.  32pp. Price £0.80p

N.B. – All prices include p & p

Cuthbert’s Leaders Insurance

Although some leaders have given conformation of an
appropriate insurance policy to cover their caving activities, the Committee
has decided that it must see each leader’s policy.  Therefore the lock on the cave will be changed
on January 1st 1979, and keys only issued to leaders who produce a suitable
insurance cover in respect of Third Party Liability.  If the policy is a householders policy, for
example, the leader must produce written evidence from his insurance company or
broker that the policy covers his caving activity.  Each leader will be receiving a letter to
this effect in the near future.  I wonder
how many leaders we shall be left with? (Does this mean that you haven’t got one Tim? Ed.)  Are we one step from caving permits – watch
it or you may be endorsed!

N.C.A News:

The NCA. AGM will soon be with us and this year it is being
held on Mendip.  It is now two years
since the Working Party Report was published. If you remember it sought out the views of the ‘grass roots’ caver in
the various regions.  The general feeling
was that individual cavers were as important as any of the large national
organisations; that the regional bodies should appoint their own
representatives to the NCA Executive Council; that the regional bodies should
have some form of protection when actions were being proposed that that may be
against their interests and so on.  So
far this report has not been implemented and we hear that the Cambrian Caving
Council are opposed to the resolution’s proposed by CSCC and the BCRA yet again.  I cannot believe that the Cambrian policy
reflects the views of their ‘grass roots’ cavers.  DCA are suggestiong that the Working Party
report should be implemented at the 1980 NCA AGM which would mean that three
years will have elapsed without any action. What to they – the NCA – DCA et al plan to do in the next 12 months that
we cavers ought to know about?  (It can
only be a stalling action on the part of DCA – Ed.)

The various posts on NCA Executive also come up for
re-election at the AGM.  At present Ric
Halliwell is the Hon. Sec of NCA. and appears to be approaching things on the
right lines and will be resigning at the next meeting after a three year
stint.   What will happen if we get a
‘non-caver’ in this important post as it has been suggested in the grapevine –
it could totally alter the face of NCA by making it a ‘Yes-man’ to the Sports
Council.  It is vitally important that
the NCA is organised such that it cannot take important policy decisions without
first referring the matter to the Regional Council for discussion at the ground
level, so to speak.

 

Jottings.

B.M.C. Rope Offer

The BMC has recently concluded an agreement with Ibex
ropes.  These are of kernmantel
construction and ‘……we judge as of good a reliability and performance as the continental
products retailed in the

UK
.’  The ropes are available by mail order or
direct sale to BMC members at a really competitive price.

Prices for the ropes are as follows:-

45 metres x 9mm £23.50 plus £1
post and packing

45 metres x 11mm £28.50 plus £1
post and packing

The ropes are fully guaranteed by the BMC and the profits
will be ploughed back into BMC.  Colours
available are white (with coloured flecks) blue, gold and green – state
alternative colour when ordering.

As the BEC is a member of the BMC members can take advantage
of the offer.  The BMC is prepared to
make special arrangements with its member organisations for delivery and
payment.  For instance, if a club wishes
to make a bulk purchase on behalf of its members (6 ropes or more) delivery
will be free.

BMC address: M.M.C., Crawford House, Precinct Centre,

Booth Street East,
Manchester,
M13 9RZ

(telephone 061 273 5835).

Lionel’s Hole

Its amazing how a cave can be ignored for several years and
suddenly several clubs become interested in the hope of extending it.  Lionel’s is no exception.  A week before our intrepid crew went down to
look for the stream the Bracknell District Caving Club had paid a visit; descended
the end complex and passed the first duck which leads to the new extensions.  They have written a short report of their
activities which is printed here in full:

Trip to Lionel’s Hole on April 1st 1978.  Party consisted of Peter Ashton, Richard and
Helen Woodson.

On a previous trip to Lionel’s we had noticed a small tube
leading off from the bottom of a rift beyond the Traverse, so we returned to
investigate it.  The tube was about 2 –
3ft wide, silted up and half full of water but we could see through a few
inches of airspace that the tube did not seem to close down.  We spent about ¾hr digging out silt end
passing it back until we had lowered the floor level by about six inches and
made just enough room to force away trough the duck on our backs.  Immediately beyond the duck the passage
widened just enough for us to twist round for a right hand bend and then a
squeeze.  This led to a large rift
passage-cum-chamber sloping upwards to the right.  We explored a couple of passages at the top
of this but did not push them to any great distance.  The slope and passages were coated with mud
and there no signs of hand or foot-prints anywhere.

We found an active stream on the left flowing quite
fast.  Upstream, a squeeze and a flat out
crawl down a narrow tube led to a dead end where the water seemed to be
emerging from a horizontal crack. Downstream, the rock dropped to within about a foot of the water and we
crawled in the stream beneath this until we came to a sump.  Although we felt that the roof rose again
quite rapidly we did not take the risk of free-diving it and the water was flowing
too fast to dam it.

We returned to the rift and after looking around a while
longer we went out.  We reckoned that we
had covered about 250ft – 300ft of passageway. We blocked up the entrance to the tube with stones and mud, fully
intending to return in the hope that the water level in the sump would
drop.  It was a very wet day as half the
road through Burrington Combe was flooded. Unfortunately we did not get a change to return.

*****************************************

December’s BB will include a report on Mendip’s best kept
secret – ROCKET DROP and a ‘stereo’ survey of part of Swildon’s survey.  Make you red and green glasses now!

Small extension made in Wigmore – about 30ft.

 

A Draft Specification For Caving Ropes

Mike Cowlishaw

For several years the Equipment
Special Committee of NCA have been preparing a specification for caving
ropes.  The draft has been sent to the BB
for members comment.  If you have
anything useful to add to Mike Cowlishaw’s notes send them to MIKE AND the
B.B.!

In July the NCA Equipment Committee set to produce the draft
specification whose main points are listed below.  It is hoped that this will eventually form
the basis of a British Standard.

The draft is mainly a working document on methods of testing
caving ropes (for SRT and/or lifelining), but suggests the following tentative
minimum values for rope characteristics:

Shrinkage: ‘preferably less than 10%’ when washed for
the first time.  This washing would form
the conditioning required before any of the follow parameters are measured.

Diameter: 12mm maximum, 9mm minimum.

Weight Dry: Maximum 100g/m.              Weight
Wet: Maximum 125g/m

Abrasion: A test that can be shown to be repeatable
has not yet been defined.  Vertical and
Horizontal abrasion tests may need to be used, although it is hoped that
Vertical abrasion alone will prove sufficient.

Energy Absorption; Peak force in a ‘small’ fall
should be tested.  The simplest method
was felt to be a straight drop test with 80kga8t fall factor 0.75.  The peak force measured should not exceed
12kN (1200kgf).

Strength: Minimum breaking force 24kN (2400kgf). c.f.
12kN peak force in Drop Test.

Temperature: The finished rope should lose no more
than 20% of its strength at 150 degrees Celsius.

Handling/Flexibility: The UIAA/ISC knotability test
would seem to cover this parameter. Insufficient figures available to enable a value to be suggested yet.

Spin: No test necessary – ‘Non Spin construction
preferred’.

Stretch at low loads: Less than 2% under 80kg
‘preferred’.

Sheath Slippage: No real evidence to justify tests being made.

Chemical resistance and U.V. resistance.  No specific tests needed, but a warning,
should be attached to new ropes of any relatively common chemicals harmful to
that rope.

Colour: predominantly white or pale in colour.

Markings: Coloured bands were considered helpful to
enable ropes to be distinguished.

COMMENTS ON THIS DRAFT ARE EARNESTLY SOLICITED, AND SHOULD
BE SENT TO

Mike Cowlishaw, 14
Plovers Down, Oliver’s Battery,

Winchester
,
Hants.

*****************************************

Tim Large requires ferrets to push the short extension at
the bottom of Marble Pot.

The B.B. is always short of material – if you’ve been write
it up for the B.B.

Building sessions at Tynings Barrows on Wednesday evenings –
help required.

If you’ve been – don’t forget to write it up in the caving
log.

Fill out the tackle book when you take tackle from the
store.

 

October 15th 1978.  Rescue Practice –
Goatchurch Cavern.

During October the MRO agreed to
join with the Red Cross in a joint exercise at Burrington Coombe – there were
to be several victims placed underground in Goatchurch.  CHRIS BATSTONE  is our reporter.

This practice was organised in co-operation with the British
Red Cross who were holding an exercise at Burrington.  The caving casualties were from the
Casualties Union, a group of people who act as the injured in such, exercises
as this.  Their acting is extremely
realistic so-much-so that one wonders if they are really acting!

The call-out came to the Hunters at approx. 12.45 p.m. and
most, of those taking part were at West Twin by 13.00 hours – probably one of
the quickest call outs on record.  A lot
may be said about the ride over on Mr. N’s car. The rescue team assembled at the Tradesman’s Entrance and the job of
ferrying rescue kit began.  Equipment
included the ‘Revival’, Paraguard Stretcher and Dave Major’s carry-sheet.

A total of seven casualties, all having an assortment of
injuries, had to be evacuated from the Boulder Chamber.  Four of the ‘wounded’ who could walk were
evacuated first and it must be said that these people played their part very
well – and of course; equally, so the rescuers. Having evacuated those capable of helping themselves, the job of
removing the three stretcher cases. Injuries consisted of one man with spinal injuries; one with broken legs
and one with a fractured collarbone.  The
last was carried out in the DM carry sheet whilst Don Thompson and Bob Pike,
our two caving doctors attended the other injuries.  Next out was the spinal injury in the
Pareguard and the carry was better and quicker due to the fact that the main
problems had been overcome on the first carry-out. After handing the injured
man over to the Red Cross at the cave entrance the Paraguard was sent down to
remove the last victim in an equally quick and efficient manner.

The whole operation was completed in about 3½ hours from
callout to the last casualty reaching the surface.  It also provided an opportunity to use the
Revival kit in conditions that were as near realistic as possible.  A lot was learnt from this practice that will
be of great use in the future.  After the
cleaning up the rescuers made their, way to the village hall at Burrington for
tea and stickies and also to admire the handiwork of Bob Pike who did an
excellent job of plastering up the two broken legs.  It took nearly twenty minutes to remove the
plaster.

An interesting twist of events came to light after the
practice – it seems a party of cavers were returning to the surface and on
seeing the carnage in the Boulder Chamber, one member of the party
fainted!  He was revived and taken out
safely.


Bristol

Exploration Club – Membership List October 1978

In keeping with past tradition the November BB contains the
current address list of members.  Fiona
has kindly done the donkey work by typing the stencils – many thanks for doing
this dismally dull job.  Will all members
check for the list for errors and contact Tim Large with any queries or errors.

Does anyone know of the address of D. Cooke-Yarborough?  Recent correspondence has been returned
address unknown.

828

Nicolette Abell

Michaelmas Cottage, Faulkland,

Bath

20 L

Bob Bagshaw


699 Wells Road
, Knowle,
Bristol,
Avon

392 L

Mike Baker

10 Riverside Walk, Midsomer Norton,
Bath,
Avon

913

Ken Baker


36 Northumberland Road
, Redland,

Bristol

901

Richard Barker

40b

Croxteth Road
,
Liverpool 8

295

Arthur Ball


4 Charlotte Street
, Cheadle,

Cheshire

892

Marlon Barlow

93 Norton drive, Norton tower, Halifax,
West
Yorkshire

818

Chris Batstone


8 Prospect Place
, Bathford,
Bath,
Avon

933

Dianne Beeching

8

seymour
Close, Wells, Somerset

390 L

Joan Bennett


8 Radnor Road
, Wesbury-on-Trym,

Bristol

214 L

Roy Bennett


8 Radnor Road
, Wesbury-on-Trym,

Bristol

860

Glenys Beszant


14 Westlea Road
, Warmley, Broxbourne, Herts.

731

Bob Bidmead

Valley Way,

Middle Street,
East
Harptree,

Bristol

720

Martin Bishop

Bishops Cottage, Priddy

364 L

Pete Blogg


5 Tyrolean Court
, Cheviot Close, Avenue Rd., Banstead,
Surrey

336 L

Alan Bonner

Crags Farm Close, Little Broughton, Cokermouth,

Cumberland

145 L

Sybil Bowden-Lyle


111 London Road
, Calne, Wiltshire

883

Brian Bowers


44 Manor Way
, Bagshot,
Surrey

868

Dany Bradshaw

7 Creswicke,

Bristol

751 L

T.A. Brookes


87 Wyatt Road,
London
, SW2

891

Neil Raynor Brown

25 Lingfield Park, Evesham, Worcs.

687

Viv Brown


3 Cross Street
, Kingswood,

Bristol

756

Tessa Burt


66 Roundwood Lane
, Harpendon, Herts

849

Alan Butcher

17 Cedar Grove, Pennfields,
Wolverhampton

924

Aileen Butcher

17 Cedar Grove, Pennfields,
Wolverhampton

777

Ian Calder

22 Greenways, Lydney, Gloucestershire

778

Penelope Calder

22 Greenways, Lydney, Gloucestershire

902

Martin Cavendar

The Old Rectory, Westbury-sub-Mendip, Wells,

Somerset

903

Francisca Cavendar

The Old Rectory, Westbury-sub-Mendip, Wells,

Somerset

785

Paul Christie

7 The Glen,

London Road
,
Sunninghill,
Ascot, Berks

782

Patricia Christie

7 The Glen,

London Road
,
Sunninghill,
Ascot, Berks

655

Colin Clark


186 Cranbrook Road
, Redland,

Bristol

211 L

Clare Coase

The Belfry, 10 Shannon Parade,
Berkeley-Vale,
New South Wales, 2259,

Australia

89 L

Alfie Collins

Lavendar Cottage, Bishop Sutton, Nr Bristol,

Somerset

377 L

D. Cooke-Yarborough

No known address

862

Bob Cork

25 The Mead, Stoke St. Michael,

Somerset

585

Tony Corrigan


139 Stockwood Lane
, Stockwood,

Bristol

827

Mike Cowlishaw

14 Plovers Down, Olivers Battery,

Winchester

890

Jerry Crick

2 Coneacre,

Chersey Road
,
Windlesham,
Surrey

680

Bob Cross


1 St. Helens Lane
, Adel, Leeds 16,
West Yorkshire

870

Gary Cullen


47 Eversfield Road,
Horsham,
Sussex

405 L

Frank Darbon


PO Box 325,
Vernon,
British
Columbia
,
Canada

423 L

Len Dawes

The Lodge,

Main Street
,
Minster Matlock, Derbyshire

449

Garth Dell

AI 5 Printing, HQNI, BFPO 825.

710

Colin Dooley


51 Osmaston Road
, Harbourne,

Birmingham
7

829

Angela Dooley


51 Osmaston Road
, Harbourne,

Birmingham
7

164 L

Ken Dobbs


85 Fox Rd.
, Beacon Heath,
Exeter,
Devon

830

John Dukes

Bridge Farm, Dulcote, Wells,

Somerset

847

Michael Durham


11 Catherine Place,
Bath

925

Gillian Durrant

14 St. Andrews road, Broadstone,
Dorset

779

Jim Durston

Hill View, Old Beat, Maidentown, Nr. Burlescombe, Tiverton,
Devon

322 L

Bryan Ellis


30 Main Road
, Westonzoyland, Bridgwater,

Somerset

232

Chris Falshaw


23 Hallam Grange Crescent
,
Sheffield

909

Helen Fielding

175 Bramley lane, Hipperholme,
Halifax,
West Yorkshire

269 L

Tom Fletcher


11 Cow Lane
, Bramcote,
Nottingham.

894

Phil Ford

27 Bryn Dyffrn, Holway, Clwyd,
North Wales

404 L

Albert Francis


22 Hervey Road
, Wells,

Somerset

569

Joyce Franklin


16 Glen Drive
, Stoke Bishop,

Bristol

469

Pete Franklin


16 Glen Drive
, Stoke Bishop,

Bristol

759

Colleen Gage


36 Woodland Road
, Nailsea,
Avon

765

Tom Gage


36 Woodland Road
, Nailsea,
Avon

835

Leonard Gee

15
Warren Close,
Denton,

Manchester

265

Stan Gee


26 Parsonage Street
, Heaton Norris,
Stockport.

836

Bob Givens

Newstead Lodge, 1 Fields Green,

Crawley,
Sussex

752

M. Glanville

Jocelyn House Mews, 18a High street, Chard

894

Bruce Glocking

213 St. Leonards,

Horsham,
Sussex

927

Richard Gough


35 Gladstone Road
, Ashstead,
Surrey

790

Martin Grass


14 Westlea Road
, Wormley, Broxbourne, Herts

900

Christine Greenhall


13 Nooreys Avenue,
Oxford

582

Chris Hall

1 Chancellors Cottage, Long Lane, Redhill,

Bristol

432 L

Nigel Hallet


62 Cranbrook Road,
Bristol

910

Sandra Halliday

6A

Collingwood Road
,
Redland,

Bristol
6

104 L

Mervyn Hannam


14 Inskip Place
, St Annes,
Lancashire

981

Chris Harvey

Byways,

Hanham Lane
,
Paulton, Somerset

4 L

Dan Hassell

Hill House, Moorlynch, Bridgwater,

Somerset

893

Dave Hatherley


6 Withiel Drive
, Cannington,
Bridgewater,

Somerset

942

Robin Hayler

39 Ditching Hill,
Southgate, Crawley,
West Sussex

917

Robin Hervin

12

York
Buildings
, Trowbridge, Wiltshire

863

John Hildrick

Tarngulla,

Old Bristol
Road
, Priddy

952

Robert Hill

32 Ridings Mead, Chippenham, Wiltshire

773

Rodney Hobbs

Rose Cottage, Nailsea

373

Sid Hobbs

Hokestone Cottage, Townsend, Priddy

736

Sylvia Hobbs

Hokestone Cottage, Townsend, Priddy

905

Paul Hodgson

11 Ockford Ridge, Godalming,
Surrey

793

Mike Hogg

32 Birchley Heath,
Nuneaton, Warks

898

Liz Hollis

1 Bugle Cottage, Milborne Wick, Nr Sherborne,
Dorset

899

Tony Hollis

1 Bugle Cottage, Milborne Wick, Nr Sherborne,
Dorset

920

Nick Holstead


14 Lower Alma street
, Trowbridge, Wiltshire

387 L

George Honey

Droppsta, 19044,

Odensala,
Sweden

928

Jennifer Hoyles


35 Gladstone Road
, Ashstead Surrey

808

John Hunt


35 Congre Road
, Filton,

Bristol

923

Trevor Hughes

Creg-ny-Baa,

Charlesford
Avenue
, Kingswood Sutton
Valence,

Maidstone,
Kent

855

Ted Humphreys

Frekes Cottage, Moorsite, Marnhull, Sturminster Newton, Dorset

363

Maurise Iles

50 Warman, Stockwood,

Bristol

906

Annette Ingleton


Seymour
Cottage, Hinton St. Mary, Sturminster Newton, Dorset

73

Angus Innes

18 David’s Close, Alveston,

Bristol
,
Aven

168

Margaret Innes

18 David’s Close, Alveston,

Bristol
,
Aven

540 L

Dave Irwin

Townsend Cottage, Townsend, Priddy,

Somerset

792

Ken James

Flat 2,

Shrubbery Road
,
Weston-super-Mare

922

Tony Jarratt

Alwyn Cottage,

Station
Road
, Congressbury,

Bristol

340

Russ Jenkins

10, Amberley Close, Downend,

Bristol

51 L

A Johnson

Warren Cottage,

Station
Rd.
, Flax Bourton,

Bristol

560 L

Frank Jones


103 Wookey Hole Road
, Wells,

Somerset

285

U. Jones

Woking Grange,

Oriental
Road
, Woking,
Surrey

907

Karen Jones

Room 63, New End Nurses Home, New End Hospital, Hampstead, London NW3

567 L

Alan Kennett

92 West Broadway, Henleaze,

Bristol

884

John King


4 Nightingale Road,
Langley
Green,

Crawley,
Sussex

316 L

Kangy King

22 Parkfield Rank, Pucklechurch,
Bristol,
Avon

542 L

Phil Kingston


257 Pemona Street,
Invercargill,
New Zealand

929

Jane Kirby

Basement Flat, 8
Worcester Terrace,
Clifton,

Bristol
8

413 L

R. Kitchen

Overcombe, Horrabridge, Yelverton,
Devon

904

Calvin Knight

Crossways. Hillesley, Wootton under Edge, Gloucestershire

762

John Knops

Ida Cottage,

235
Englishcombe Lane
,
Bath

874

Dave Lampard

Woodpeckers,

11
Springfield Park Road
,
Horsham,
Sussex

667 L

Tim Large

c/o Trading Standards Office,

South
Street
, Wells, Somerset

795

Peter Leigh

5 Armoured Workshops, BFPO 126, Enkessen

930

Stuart Lindsay

5 Laburnum Walk, Keynsham, Bristil

574 L

Oliver Lloyd

Withey House, Withey Close West, Westbury-on-Trym,

Bristol

58

George Lucy

Pike Croft, Long Lane, Tilehurst,

Reading
,
Berks

495 L

Val Luckwill


8 Greenslade Road
, Sedgeley hill, Dudley, Worcs.

550 L

R A MacGregor

12 Douro Close, Baughurst,
Basingstoke,
Hants

725

Stuart McManus


33 Wellsford Avenue
, Wells,

Somerset

722

A. McRory-Peace


5 Colmer Road
, Yeovil Somerset

106 L

E.J. Mason


33 Bradleys Avenue
, Henleaze,

Bristol

558 L

Tony Meaden

Highcroft, Westbury, Bradford Abbas, Sherborne, Dorset

704

Dave Metcalfe


10 Troughton Crescent
,
Blackpool, Lancs.

931

Warren Miner-Williams

8 litton Court,

Blakeney
Road
, Patchway,

Bristol

308

Keith Murray

17
Harrington
Gardens,

London
  SW7

936

Dave Nicholls


Australia
?

852

John Noble


18 Hope Place
,

Tennis Court
Road, Paulton

880

Graham Nye


7 Ramsey Road
, Horsham,
Surrey

938

Kevin O’Neil


4 East Street
, Laycock, Chippenham, Wiltshire

624

J. Orr

8
Wellington Terrace, Winklebury,
Basingstoke, Hants

396 L

Mike Palmer

Laurel Farm, YarleyHill, Yarley, Wells,

Somerset

22 L

Les Peters


21 Melbury Rd.
,
Knowle
Park,
Bristol
Avon

499 L

Tony Philpott


3 Kings Drive
, Bishopston,
Bristol,
Avon

724

Graham Phippen

Rock Cottage,

Rock Road
,
Wick,

Bristol

944

Steve Plumley

4 rickford lane, Burrington, Nr. Bristol

337

Brian Prewer

East View, West Horrington, Wells,

Somerset

886

Jeff Price


18 Hurston Road
,

Inns Court,
Bristol

622

Colin Priddle

10 Franklyn Flats,

Kopje
Road
,
Gwelo,
Rhodesia

481 L

John Ransom


21 Bradley Rd.
, Patchway,
Bristol,
Avon

452 L

Pam Rees

No Known Address

343 L

A Rich


Box 126,
Basham,
Alberta
Canada

672 L

R Richards


PO Box 141
, Jacobs,

Natal,
South Africa

682

John Riley

Araluen, Linershwood Close, Bramley,
Surrey

921

Pete Rose

2 The Beacon, Ilminster

918

Richard Round


131 Middleton Road
, Banbury, Oxfordshire

932

Theresa Rumble

71 Chiltern Close, Warmley,

Bristol

832

Roger Sabido

15 Concorde drive, Westbury-on-Trym,

Bristol

941

John Sampson

8 Hillcrest, Knowle,

Bristol

240 L

Alan Sandall


43 Meadway Ave.
, Nailsea,
Avon

359 L

Carol Sandall


43 Meadway Ave.
, Nailsea,
Avon

760

Jenny Sandercroft

5 Eastcroft, Henleaze,

Bristol

747

Derek Sanderson

23 Penzeance Gardesn, Harold Hill, Romford, Essex.

237 L

B. Scott

Merrymead,

Havestock Road,
Winchester
Hants

482

Gordon Selby

2 dodd Avenue, Wells,

Somerset

78 L

R.A. Setterington


4 Galmington Lane,
Taunton
, Somerset

213 L

R. Setterington


4 Cavendish Road
, Chiswick,

London
W4

864

Chris Shaw

7
Queens Head Walk, Wormley,
Broxbourne, Herts.

872

Mark Sherman

Wood View, Grey Field, High Litton

926

Steve Short


78 Greenwood Avenue
, Laverstock,

Salisbury
,
Wilts.

915

Chris Smart

15 Timor Close,
Popley
Islands,
Basingstoke,
Hants

911

James Smart

c/o

72 Winchester Road
,
Brislington,

Bristol

823

Andy Sparrow


2 Grosvenor Place,
London
Road,

Bath

851

Maurice Stafford

28 Rowan Close, Sonning Common,

Reading
,
Berks.

1 L

Harry Stanbury


31 Belvoir Road
, St. Andrews,

Bristol

38L

Mrs I Stanbury

74 Redcatch, Knowle,

Bristol

840

G. Standring


71 Vienna Road
, Edgeley, Stockport,

Chester

575 L

D. Statham

The Bungallow, North Barrow, Yeovil,

Somerset

365 L

Roger Stenner


18 Stafford Place
, Weston super Mare,
Avon

837

Richard Stevenson

Greystones, Priddy

865

Paul Stokes


32 Manor Way
, Bagshot,
Surrey

583

Derek Targett

North Hall Cottage, Chilcompton

800

Mike Taylor

39 Reedley road, Westbury-on-Trym,

Bristol

772

Nigel Taylor

Whidden Farm, Chilcote, Nr. Wells,

Somerset

919

Tom Temple

3 Larch Close, Lee-on-Solent, Hants.

284 L

Allan Thomas

Allens House,

Nine Barrows
Lane
, Priddy,

Somerset

348 L

D Thomas

Pendant, Little Birch, Bartlestree,

Hereford

571 L

N Thomas

Holly Lodge,

Norwich Rd.
,
Salhouse,
Norwich,

Norfolk
.

876

Nick Thorne


20 Hawkers Lane
, Wells, Somerset

699

Buckett Tilbury

15 Fernie Fields,
High Wycombe, Bucks

700

Anne Tilbury

15 Fernie Fields,
High Wycombe, Bucks

692

Roger Toms


18 Hoton Road
, Wysemold, Leicester

803

R.S. Toms


18 Hoton Road
, Wysemold, Leicester

80

J.M. Postle Tompsett


11 Lodge Avenue
, Great Baddow,
Chelmsford,
Essex

74 L

M.J. Dizzie Tompsett


11 Lodge Avenue
, Great Baddow,
Chelmsford,
Essex

381 L

Daphne Towler

7 Ross Close, Nyetimber,

Bognor
Regis
,
Sussex

157 L

Jill Tuck

3 Crown Rise, Llanfrechfa, Cwmbran, Gwent,

Wales

328

Steve Tuck

Colles Close, Wells,

Somerset

768

Tony Tucker

75 Lower Whitelands, Tynings, Radstock,
Avon

769

Sue Tucker

75 Lower Whitelands, Tynings, Radstock,
Avon

678

Dave Turner

Moonrakers,

Brewery Lane
,
Holcombe,

Bath

912

John Turner

Orchard Cottage, 92 Church lane, Backwell,
Avon

635 L

S. Tuttlebury


28 Butts Road,
Alton
, Hants.

887

Greg Villis

The Oaks,

Round Oak Road
,
Cheddar,

Somerset

175 L

D. Waddon

32 Laxton Close,
Taunton,

Somerset

592

Eddie Welch


18 Station Road
, Filton,

Bristol

397

Mike Wheadon

91 The Oval,

Bath

861

Maureen Wheadon

91 The Oval,

Bath

553

Bob White

Weavers Farm, Binegar

878

Ross White

9 Ellery Grove, Lymington, Hants.

939

Wally Wilkinson


17 Kings Street
, Melksham, Wiltshire

940

Val Wilkinson


17 Kings Street
, Melksham, Wiltshire

934

Colin Williams

Whitestones Farm, Cheddar Cross Roads,
Compton Martin,

Bristol

885

Claire Williams

Whitestones Farm, Cheddar Cross Roads,
Compton Martin,

Bristol

916

Jane Wilson

University lab of Psychology,

Park
Road
,
Oxford

559

Barry Wilton

Valley View,

27 Venus Lane
,
Clutton,

Bristol

568

Brenda Wilton

Valley View,

27 Venus Lane
,
Clutton,

Bristol

721

Graham Wilton-Jones


24 Redland Way
, Aylesbury, Bucks

850

Annie Wilton-Jones

Cwm Dwr,

110 Pierce Avenue
,
Olton, Solihull,
West Midlands

813

Ian Wilton-Jones

Cwm Dwr,

110 Pierce Avenue
,
Olton, Solihull,
West Midlands

738

Roger Wing

15
Penleaze
Gardens, Harold Hill, Romford,
Essex

943

Simon Woodman

Link Batch, Burrington, Nr Bristol,
Avon

877

Steve Woolven

21 Three Acres,

Horsham,
Sussex

914

Brian Workman

11 Moreland, 11 New
Bath Road, Radstock,

Bath

937

Sue Yea

Bridge Farm, Dulcote, Nr. Wells,

Somerset

 

Club Officers and Appointments

Trustees: Bob Bagshaw; Roy Bennett; Les Peters and Alan
Thomas

Committee:

Chairman: Dave Irwin

Hon Sec: Tim Large

Hut Warden: Chris Batstone

Hon Treas: Sue Tucker

Caving Sec: Martin Grass

Hut Engineer: Nigel Taylor

Tacklemaster: John Dukes

B.B. Editor: Dave Irwin

Committee Members: Graham Wilton-Jones and Bob Cross

Librarian: Dave Irwin

Publications (Sales and Editor): Glynis Bezant

B.B. Postal: John Dukes

Ian Dear Memorial Sub-Committee: R. (Sett) Setterington and
Mike Palmer plus the Caving Secretary and Hon. Treasurer

As Climbing Sec has been dropped as a Club Officer, Bob
Cross has volunteered to be our contact man with Climbing activities and the
B.M.C.

C.S.C.C representative: Tim Large

*****************************************

Revised Burrington Atlas being prepared – early photographs
of the caves and cavers required.

Committee to discuss publications and future policy at
November Committee Meeting.

See Lifeline for details of change to Cuthbert’s lock and
tackle arrangements.

See Jottings for details of cheap rope offer.

Have you order sweatshirt? You must get the ‘Bertie’ sweatshirt. Contact John Dukes NOW.

The views expressed by contributors to the Belfry Bulletin,
including those of club officers, are not necessarily the views of the
committee of the Bristol Exploration Club or the Editor, unless so stated.  The Editor cannot guarantee that the accuracy
of information contained in the contributed matter, as it cannot normally be
checked in the time at his disposal.

EDITOR: D.J. Irwin, Townsend Cottage, Priddy, Nr. Wells,

Somerset
. Tele: Priddy
.369

Date for your diaries:

February 25th. Derbyshire – Winnatts Head Cave & Peak
Cavern – details from the Caving Sec: Martin Grass.

 

© 2024 Bristol Exploration Club Ltd

registered in England and Wales as a co-operative society under the Co-operative and Community Benefit Societies Act 2014, registered no. 4934.

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