QUODCUMQUE  FACIENDUM : NIMIS  FACIEMUS

Editorial

Many A Slip

In spite of the remarks made in the January editorial, it is now February 14th as I write this, and the B.B. for January is still not printed.  In fact it has now been agreed to issue the January and February numbers together.

This is, admittedly, a setback. It could be said - and no doubt will be said by some - that the B.B. is still just as bad as it was prior to the formation of a team to run it. The snag at present is in the printing. The actual machine is basically reliable and has run for several years without trouble.  The reason why it is taking so long to cure its present troubles is that it is not possible to obtain expert advice, and we are having to learn the hard way, The one great advantage of this is that when we have learned, we will at least know how to avoid these troubles in the future.

In other respects, the team IS working.  The proportion of the B.B. now typed by other hands is now over 50% and the rest of the organisation is working.  Even if it takes us much longer than was originally thought to get the new B.B. running smoothly I am convinced that the team idea is the only real long term solution. Apart from our restoring the regularity of the B.B.

I hope that, as a demonstration during this year, it will prove practical to produce a B.B. entirely by the efforts of the other members of the team. This will show that it is possible for any one member to be unavailable without affecting the B.B.

N.C.A.

Dave Irwin, secretary of the Southern Council, writes on this topic in this B.B.  His suggestions are broadly in line with the findings of the Working Party.  The C.S.C.C. Working Party have met and have recommendations to put to the Southern Council at their next meeting.  We then have the Special meeting of N.C.A. at which, it must be hoped, and some positive decision will be taken.

Secretarial

Again, this month there are some amendments to the Membership List and we welcome some new members together with the return of a few ‘older’ ones: -

New Members :

907 Jones, K.G.             65 MacDonald Road, Lightwater, Surrey.
908 Lord, P.        Greengates School, Apparto Postal 41-659, Mexico 10, DF.
909 Fielding, H 19 Queens Terrace, Jesmond, Newcastle on Tyne.
910 Halliday, S 6A Collingwood Road, Redland, Bristol 6
911 Smart, J.A.             c/o 72 Winchester Road, Brislington, Bristol.

Oldies ~

232 Falshaw, C.P          23 Hallam Grange Crescent, Sheffield, S10 4BA.
731 Bidmead, R:F          63 Cassell Road, Fishponds, Bristol.
581 Harvey, C.F             Byways, Hanham Lane, Paulton.

C of A' s

585 Corrigan, A   139 Stockwood Lane, Stockwood, Bristol.
449 Dell, G.T     A 15 Printing, HQNI, B.F.P.Oo 825
830 Dukes, J     6 Butcombe Court, Wrington, Bristol
322L Ellis, B.M    30 Main Road, Weston Zoyland, Bridgwater. TA7 OEB.
894 Ford, P.H.   34 New Street, Deiniolen, Gwynedd.
363 lIes, M.W.   50 Warman Close, Stockwood, Bristol.
550L MacGregor, A.         12 Douro Close, Baughurst, Basingstoke, RG26 5PG
852 Noble, J.G.   18 Hope Place, Tennis Court Road, Paulton BS18 5LT
365L Stenner, R   18 Stafford Place, Weston Super Mare
635L Tuttlebury, S.A  29 Beacon Close, Roundstone, Farnham, Surrey.


 

The 1977 Dinner

Like it or not, the inquest is now complete, or if not then you're too late.  Actually, there has been a reasonable response to the dinner questionnaire though compilation of the results has presented quite a statistical problem in the attempt to decipher opinion and the majority's recommended action.

First Item, STYLE:

74% of the returns think that our type of dinner is right for formality and answering thus, saved themselves the bother of questions 2 and 3 of this section.  Of the remainder, the 'more formality' outnumbered the 'less formal' by 2:1.

Second Item, SURROUNDINGS:

This, I resolved had to be a combined answered item because neither answer to the questions was mutually exclusive.  I found that 46% would prefer the plush hotel but are reasonably happy about some of the recent venues.  30%, (including some of the majority) would be happy if the dinner were held in Priddy Village Hall whilst 15% don’t care about the surroundings.  The rem¬ainder (9%) think that surroundings are important, would not be happy at the PVH yet have been satisfied with recent year's surroundings.

Third Item, VENUE:

This item turned out to have 42% in favour of holding the dinner 'close' to the Belfry whilst a further 42% think that the distance/place doesn't matter.  Only 8% were firm that the dinner should be in Bristol though 4% stated just as firmly that it should not.  As far as distance is concerned, the mean distance turned out to be 22 miles radius but the Mode was 10 miles from the Belfry - so I prefer the latter.

Fourth Item, SIZE:

53% of the responses think that the present size situation is OK whilst the remaining 37% think-that a limit should be set.  Strangely enough, working on some of the restriction suggestions lead to the conclusion that if invoked and all those eligible turned up, we would have greater numbers than ever before.  Apart from that, the suggested limits varied from 100 to 200.  Again, the Mode was 150 and that is roughly as at present.

Fifth Item, PRICE:

This was clearly a difficult question to try to answer in these days of inflation and a range of both maximum and realistic prices were quoted, with the maximum varying from £3.00 to £8.00 – the main being £5.00.  The range for realism was from £4.00 to £7.00 with a mean of £5.00.  In both instances the Mean and the Mods coincided so it seems that our aim should be for £4.00 but prepared for £5.00.

Sixth Item, FOOD:

Not surprisingly, because the question was asked that way, 96% are in favour of a 'better than average' menu though, surprisingly, the question of cold fare versus hot fare only produced a weighting of 12% against – from which I gather that a better than average could turn up to be acceptable.

Seventh Item, SPEECHES:

Once again a problem for analysis as there were really two questions in one and the need positive or negative answers (each) but we got many crosses and ticks meaning what (?). Anyway it seems that ½ the responses think that speeches are a waste of time whilst at the same time 75% think that toasts (which presumably include speeches) are OK particularly if witty and amusing.  They (speeches) should be regarded as part of the entertainment and presentations (not understood by some) if apt, were OK.

Last Item, ENTERTAINMENT:

  There was a total agreement in this matter; it should definitely be part of the BEC Dinner scene.  99% thought our entertainment should be homespun and that the Christmas Barrel and Caving thru the Ages were our best efforts.  11% thought that we should have a professional folk singer and all thought that we should have a system of making the entertainment louder than the audience.

That seems to be the total of the evidence and still it leaves the committee with the problem of venue and facility.  We are asking that establishments such as, say, The Cave Man, The Cliff, City Arms (Wells) Royal Hotel (Bristol) and Nick Barrington’s quote for 150 persons. However with typical prices we will still continue for the short term to pursue the private venue and Catering Service in the hope that we can avoid restaurant prices for Wine and Beer.


 

Heale Farm Cave

Heale Farm Cave was discovered by the Beechen Cliff School Caving Club over two years ago yet remains largely unknown and as far as I know is the first account of the cave to be published.  It is a significant cave in a so far unproductive area and its depth of 195 feet and length of around 500 feet make it the largest development found East of Stoke Lane Slocker.  The cave location is described in "The Caves of Mendip" under the name Heale Farm dig but the entrance is not obvious, being protected by lengths of timber which should be replaced on leaving the cave.

The cave entrance is a free climbable shaft which is 30 feet deep and must be treated with some care due to its instability.  Beneath the shaft, a series of steeply descending squeezes lead down between boulders to a short climb down into a roomier passage.  At this point, the stream becomes audible as a dull roar from below.  Passing through a small hole and climbing down past the hanging death (a suspended boulder) the stream is met emerging from under a boulder pile.  The streamway begins as a low wet crawl before the roof rises at the head of a 23 ft pitch into the Main Chamber.  This can be free climbed but a ladder is advised as the rock is rotten.  The pitch can be one of the wettest on Mendip and is certainly a highlight of any trip down the cave.

From the base of the pitch the large Main Chamber floor descends steeply to where the stream disappears through a hole in the floor.  Passing this point and continuing to the end of the chamber, another hole is reached and this is found to be the way on.  From this point the passages are covered in a thick deposit of glutinous mud and squeezing down be¬tween boulders leads back into the streamway for a short distance to where the stream vanishes into a muddy choke.  From this point the way on is upwards by climbing a 20 ft chimney (one wall is like a vertical manure heap) to a short section of level passage.  This passage ends over a choked pot above which is a difficult traverse and 20 ft climb up into the final 30 ft of passage which eventually becomes too tight to follow.

The Cave appears to be a one stage development formed along a fault.  The possibility of further passage is debateable but the terminal rift is 3 ft wide and over 30 ft high and shows no sign of narrowing before its total mud choke.  The cave still has 100 ft to drop before reaching a resurgence level (Seven Springs, Asham Wood).

One point which should be mentioned is that on the day the cave was dis¬covered the Main Chamber was sumped half way down.  The massive mud deposits in the cave begin at this point and there is the possibility of a seasonal sump (likely but not confirmed).  Access to the cave is controlled by the farmer who is very pleasant and obliging; let us hope that no-one spoils this situation.

The Survey: A copy of the Survey is shown opposite and is based on a BCRA Grade 4.  Several high level passages above the Main Chamber and Terminal Rift are omitted or drawn from memory.

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SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE DUE TO BE PAID BETWEEN NOW AND APRIL 30TH. FULL MEMBERSHIP IS £3-00: JOINT MEMBERSHIP IS £4.25 and JUNIOR MEMBERSHIP IS £1.80.  CHEQUES SHOULD BE MADE OUT TO THE B.E.C AND ROUTED TO MIKE WHEADON, MEMBERSHIP SECRETARY,


 

Fifth Column – A Birds’ Eye View of Mendip

January, so the rhyme says, brings rain and snow.  It also brings in the bills to prove that a ten day Christmas holiday is quite expensive - to say the least.  This, of course, could be the cause of the slightly thinner crowds at the Hunters.

To brighten January, though, there has been at least one high spot - apart from the Jagos' party. This was on the 20th when, at approximately 5.30 pm, a coach load of Temperance League members (which included fifteen B.EC. representatives) attended a tour of the Badger brewery at Blandford in Dorset  All went well, even though the driver did manage to get lost in the grounds of the brewery - causing some faithless members of the party to become rather panicky when it appeared at one stage that we would not be able to find the proper entrance and to mutter that the landlord wasn't able to organise the proverbial in a brewery.     Anyway, at 1.45 the next morning, a weary and not too sober party arrived back at the Hunters, after having had an excellent evening and also starting what we hope will turn into an annual event (Hint!)

On to more sober matters. Congratulations to Roy and Roe Marshall on the birth of their son, Andrew Jonathan.  Commiserations to Jenny Sandercott on having her office in Park Street, Bristol blown up - or was it down? - by what will probably turn out to be natural gas.

Come to think of it, this hazard has been on Mendip for some time, especially after a Saturday night barrel! Talking of barrels, Phil Kingston and Yo were back from New Zealand recently and made their visit even more welcome by aiding celebrations with a barrel.  Wig has been seen at the Hunters on several recent occasions, proving that all rumours regarding his disappearance for a meeting of the CNCC; DCA; CSCC: NCA (or, was it the CCC?) were groundless.

Carol and Alan Sandall have also paid their bi-annual visit to Mendip.  Perhaps they may decide, after reminding themselves of the delights of a Saturday night at the Hunters, to come more often.  Dare we suggest once a year?

No wonder that plans are afoot to improve the Belfry again, when our 'hard man' Bob Cross admits to enjoying himself at a Welsh hotel on his recent visit to North Wales.  It is believed that Martin Bishop is again fully mended and working well.  Let us hope that this will be permanent, as surely there is nothing left for him to break! Tony Corrigan has had his operation at last, and we wish him a speedy recovery and hope to see him in circulation again soon.

Special Notice

Owing to continuing trouble with the printing machine, this B. B. is to be printed commercially, from our paper plates and, as a result, will be out BEFORE the January B.B. Don't think you have been missed out for January.  We will get this out as soon as the machine is working.  Since it was half printed, it could not be taken on by the commercial printers.

Stop Press!

Tynings Barrow Swallet has gone!  Full details of this new Mendip cave (we hope) in the B.B for March, which will appear (we hope) actually IN March!


 

Notes on the Structure of the N.C.A. and Regional Councils

About 12 years ago, when the controversy over the formation of a National Council began, I published a not very well constructed article in the BB arguing the case in favour of such a body emphasising that it should not be a politically based organisation. What I had in mind was that we had no National Organisation which could speak authoritively on behalf of the caving world in answer to the (then) bad public image that the recreation had acquired due to bad reportage in Broadcasting media and National Press and a well founded National Council could do this in addition to developing interest in various activities and aspect of Speleology by creating (e.g.) a national Library, Conference Centre and ‘Clearing House’ for all forms of information. This was a bit of a long term dream though and to be accurate, there was already in form a National coverage in the Cave Research Group of Great Britain but they were in no way interested in a National Council and even as late as 1970 (When I was a committee member) they still didn’t want to know.

In the interim years however, after long arguments the N.C.A. did come into being (as an all embracing body with a vaguely regional basis) though having no clearly defined path to follow it has, for the last 6-7 years wallowed around wasting effort and clutching at straws in an attempt to demonstrate that it is active on behalf of a cavers.  To this day, cavers remain suspicious of the NCA and fear that it might upset the ‘status quo’.  It has fallen into the trap of forming ‘Special Committees’ which have evolved to the form of Standing Committees, free to take on any business they feel inclined to follow and a as a result have become ineffective, inefficient and intolerably slow, they are viewed by the average caver with disdain and as mini empires, and do nothing but produce unnecessary paperwork.

In addition, the N.C.A. has created some problems for life itself by using poor or misguided information sources (The Sports Council Grant Aid and Whernside Manor to name two) causing misunderstanding in the Caving community.  This, in turn, caused strains on the organisation and whenever any form of criticism was voiced (e.g. Reynolds & Collins) there was a consequent over reaction and stupid actions taken (i.e. backbiting and an absence of published reports etc.)  So the stage exist today where (as far as I can see) the four caving regions are broadly divided into two camps comprised of (CNCC/CSCC) and (DGA/CCC) and the division of opinion is largely due to the influence of individuals who are so totally opposed that it will be difficult to form any evenly representative group of cavers around the Council table at NCA meetings.  The extremes of view range from the individual who believes that the NCA should be the hub of caving activities to the one who believes that the NCA should merely be a watchdog without any teeth.

So, what can be done? In my view the following could be some of the actions taken to resolve the situation: -

a.                  The N.C.A. should be constructed so as to have a Chairman, an Hon. Sec. and Hon. Treas. as elected officers and the Council should additionally be constituted of an elected delegate from each of the four regions (substitutes should also be elected by the regions to meet the case where a delegate cannot attend.)

b.                  Scientific bodies and other specialised constituent members should be unrepresented on the council as all members already belong to the various Caving Clubs who, in turn, are represented at regional level.  These bodies should be operated as advisory and should provide a representation whenever specialised information is required.  This would eliminate the personal professional interest which could slant an investigation to a particular end.

c.                  Special Committees should only be formed when a body dealing with a particular problem does not already exist.  For example, development of 'special equipment' should not be passed to the Equipment Special Committees (as it is at present) but should be passed to the BCRA who are the  'research' organisation and would thus eliminate duplicate organisations and would obviate additional costs.  Should however, a need arise for a special committee then the NCA Executive should appoint/convene one for that part¬icular purpose only and with Terms of Reference which would ensure that the appropriate report back is made.  In general though, the NCA should only make the necessary introductions so that Regional Officials could obtain information and initiate the necessary action.  The NCA should only involve itself in Regional problems when all other efforts have failed to produce the required results.

The current work of the NCA is largely preventative and as an informant to outside bodies and for the 7 or 8 years of its existence has done little else which it can claim as a success.  It has had little influence in the case of White Scar, OFD and is absolutely helpless 30 far as ODB is concerned and the NWCC’s fight with Tarmac.  The successes attributed to the NCA to date have rather been due to the actions of individuals acting in the interests of NCA.

Keeping its workload to a minimum and the contentious 'philosophical' arguments out of the Council/Executive's work area will result in more harmonious relationship with its constituents.  The NCA must, to keep its faith with the 'grass roots', display some interest in the activities of the caving world by acting as a centre for information and by the publication of a Newsletter (the cheapest approach for this would be similar to that used by Church Magazines where National News is pre-printed and inserted into local publications) but giving the responsibility for circulation to the Regional Council.  In the CSCC region a Newsletter has just started being produced and this is circulated to all member clubs and is also on sale at various outlet points to non-member clubs and cavers.  Cavers require rapid and accurate information and if an NCA Newsletter could be seen as being produced together with a local regional publication then this would create a feeling of being part of the one organisation yet maintaining a regional independence.

Regional Councils: To maintain democratic representation on the NCA, the structure of the Regional Councils should be amended to ensure that a policy of one club - one region prevails.  At present, a club may join all the four regions then the regional structure would collapse and be left in the hands of the politicians.  This could easily happen under such circumstances as we have at present where cavers are from being interested in the NCA politics. Membership of a Regional Council should be automatic to a club and it should not have the problem of needing to be proposed and seconded (as though it were a privilege to belong) thus the regional structure would have all clubs within the same framework - the established clubs being able to guide the newer members along the right rails.  This would mean that clubs will be members of a Regional Council of their choice, or, automatically join the Council which is most effective in their home area - this of course suggests that Regional Councils will not be based in the principal caving regions but the country will be split geographically.  Membership should not be compulsory.

In summary, I recommended that the NCA be re-structured around the active caver and should make an attempt to provide him/her with any information he requires.  At the same time, the NCA should attempt to act a as advisor to any outside organisation to ensure that any information it requires (or uses) is correct and accurate.  It would further be advantageous if the NCA encouraged (or if possible; enforced) the specialist –bodies to discharge their responsibilities by passing the appropriate work to them for action.  The status of the Regional Councils should be strengthened by prevention of joint memberships by the caving clubs without at the same time, overriding (the right to veto or some similar mechanism) the freedom of the individual clubs.

“Wig”

Friday Niters

The Inter-Club Friday Night meet programme is scheduled below.  The meet is at the cave entrance at 7.30 pm.  For South Wales trips, names should be forwarded to Richard Kenny (B. Prewer at wells 73757 can pass name on).

March 4th          St. Cuthbert’s (limited number)

March 19th        South Wales

April 1st  Cuckoo Cleeves

April 15th          Swildons

April 29th          Longwood

May 13th Sludge/Nine Barrows

Mat 27th Shatter/Withyhill (limited numbers)

June 10th          Stoke Lane

June 24th          Burrington evening.  Meet at Goatchurch

July 9th   South Wales

July 22nd          Fox Stone Mines


 

Tynnings Barrows Swallet

B.B. Supplement – Late Extra

As many members will by now be aware, the dig in the choke at Tynings Barrows Swallet has gone, yielding at least 3000 feet of passages of which 1,600 feet is streamway and the remainder is side passages.

Members of Axbridge Caving Group looked at the site after it collapsed following the ‘68 floods.  It dropped very rapidly via a clean washed streamway to a gravel cum boulder choke.  However, the farmer, Mr. Paton, decided to fill the collapse in.

Early in 1976 Snab, of the Grampians, having got to know the farmer fairly well was able to negotiate access to the site, and digging started.  On April 18th, only after only five hours of diggings the cave was open once again, various members of the B.E.C. and Grampian having had a hand in the excavation.  Between then and the summer much activity saw a concrete pipe entrance in position, the swallet nearly filled up again, and many boulders below semi-stabilised. Digging at the old choke then started, and, although rather sporadic, little effort was needed for the breakthrough, which occurred on February 15th this year.  A small group of B.E.C. and Grampian cleared the choke, enlarging it considerably from the far side.  On this trip the present bottom of the cave was reached.  Seven other trips and two weeks later many of the side passages have been explored, the survey has been started, and the bottom is being dug.

Descent of the concrete pipe is by ladder, and a second ladder pitch follows immediately into a chamber of mud and large, loose .boulders.  A river of mud then follows – a couple of collapses caused by the heavy winter rains after last years drought have deposited tons of very liquid mud into the upper reaches of the system.  Already this has reached the breakthrough and is destined to go much further.  Only the passage of cavers will keep this upper section open.  The breakthrough is steep, but no longer tight as it was originally.

The main way on downwards is fairly obvious, the passage quickly increasing from a grovel and stoop to walking size, and being joined by three inlets.  Passage sizes especially height, increases further as the climb to an upper series, Paton Place, is passed.  There is a lot of collapse in this region, until the water drops down the Aardvark Trap.  The way onwards, over the Trap, becomes narrow and low, with gour flooring and old, broken stal.  After a small sump and an inlet on the left the passage size increases dramatically and drops steeply down to Pyramid Pot.  In this second large section there is a further collapse, due in part to faulting. However, since all the rock is very shaley (the cave is formed almost entirely within the Lower limestone Shales) the debris has been washed away.

Below the pot, the way on is initially smaller, with the passage zig-zagging, first on the strike, then on the dip, back to the strike and so on.  There are only a couple of places between here and the end where it is necessary to crawl, each for a short distance.  Much of the passage is a high, narrow, strike orientated rift. More stalagmite is to be seen in this lower section, though it appears to be old, and is either broken, very dead, or undergoing re-solution.

Near the present terminus ‘A Day’, there is a gradual build up of gravel deposits, until finally it nearly fills a dip section of passage to the roof.  This is being dug at present, but the excessive amounts of water this winter make progress difficult.

Since the initial breakthrough nearly all the side passages have been fairly well explored, though there are still several loose ends.  The whole of the roof from 'A Day' to Pyramid Pot has been thoroughly checked, and there seems to be no possibility of extension either over the final dig, or elsewhere, from here.  Drunken Horse Passage, an inlet entering from the North, in the lower section of stream passage, goes for about 300 feet to a tight section.  Its stream is full of organic matter.  The lower inlet at the Cheese Grater, a heavily stal-ed narrow section of rift, becomes tight after a very short distance.  Holes among the stal in the zig-zags appear to close down just above the general roof level.  However, a large passage with a wide flow of stal in the same area has been pushed through two low sections to a narrow sharp rift.  Here the spirifer shells, which tear clothes and bodies in other parts of the cave, actually prevented the explorers from continuing along the rift.

The Aardvark Trap has been explored for some distance to a chamber, and then a sump.  This may correspond with the sump in the main passage, above Pyramid.  Just below the latter sump is at least 400 feet of narrow rift passage leading off - Velcro Passage, very appropriately named.  It leads to Hairy Chamber, and also a high level passage with an impenetrable connection with the Upper Series of Paton Place.  This has proved to be an extensive series containing a little, very good stal.  Several skeletons of rodents and some bat-bones (there are also bat bones in the lower part of the cave).  One of the skeletons has already been totally destroyed by someone's boot, all the more alloying considering the handful of people who have actually gone down the cave so far.  The stal will not last long.  Passing via the large Dragon Chamber, at one of the extremities of this series, leads back to a rift just below the breakthrough, so there are two possible routes into the series.

Much work remains to be done. Apart from the exploration, which seems almost complete down to 'A Day' already, there is the new dig itself.  Although this looks very premising it is likely that it will require a considerable effort - much more than the breakthrough did.  The stream can be seen running along a strike passage, over gravel, as far as a nife beam will penetrate in the inevitable mist. The bedrock floor is probably at least ten feet below this level.

The survey of the main passage to the bottom has been started, and the initial line should not be long in coming.  However, the very nature of many of the inlet passages, narrow, twisting, and with an incredible abundance of the sharp, Spirifer fossils, precludes speed or accuracy, and we will probably go for the former, except for the major passages.

Access is at present restricted to members of the digging team and their guests.  This situation will remain until work in the cave, excepting digging, is complete.  Considering that the cave was totally closed for eight years, we are extremely fortunate now that it is open at all.  It is to be hoped that prospective visitors will respect the restrictions and bide their time.  Access arrangements are due to be worked out with Mr. Paton.  Any enquiries for the future should be addressed to the Belfry.

Graham Wilton-Jones.

 

Typed and printed by Townsend Duplicating Services Inc.


 

Proposed Alterations To 'The Belfry

The Committee would like suggestions on the next stage of alterations to the Belfry.  The central core of the hut is not being utilised fully, and the plan below is a possibility, which would not entail a large capital outlay, but would satisfy some of the criticisms that we have had from members.  If you have any suggestions could you let the Hut Engineer have them at the very latest by May 6th.

Main Changing Room

1.                  Move the library into the main room in strong lockers.  The library at the moment is no longer large enough to hold everything.

2.                  Block existing door from library into main room.

3.                  Build low wall as shown, install two shower heads and tile throughout.

4.                  Remove part of wall between library and existing changing room, as shown.  Install 2 metre concrete lintel.

5.                  Build wall between existing changing room and existing shower unit.

Unliberated Persons Changing Room

6.                  Remove wall at the back of individual shower unit.

7.                  Build low wall as shown, install two shower heads and tile throughout.

We have already purchased the tiles that would be required and the only outlay would be for 8 stop-cocks for showers. (The existing mixer valves would have to be replaced in the near future as they are fast becoming un-repairable) plus a small amount of sand and cement. 

To ventilate both changing rooms we have at the moment a 12” extract fan and with a small amount of ducting this could be put into operation.


 

Monthly Crossword Number 72

 

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Across (Passages)

6. Could make the difference to fixed tackle in the lack of trust.  (4)
7. Underground passage on the right lines perhaps in Cuthbert’s. (6)
8. We flood hill, but not by blocking up this swallet. (11)
9. Becoming this is hardly a becoming position for a caver. (5)
10. Affectionate name for late Mendip caver. (5)
13. Many red ties describe cave bearing rocks. (11)
15. Return Journey – led by the nose? (6)
16. The same either way. (4)

Down (Pitches)

1. Primitive boat describes most Mendip swallet caves. (6)
2. A vandal might somehow cast tiles at these. (11)
3. Holy man with three directions for once popular Belfry food. (5)
4. Caves are almost entirely this. (2,9)
5. Three of this in Swildons Three…. (4)
11……and nine of this nearly. (5)
12. Abstainer and three directions for temporary shelters. (5)
14. Hardly a difficult clue. (4)

Solution To No. 71

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Club Headquarters

The Belfry, Wells Rd, Priddy, Wells, Somerset.  Telephone WELLS 72126

Club Committee

Chairman          S.J. Collins

Minutes Sec      M. Wheadon

Members           C. Batstone, P. Christie, J. Dukes, R. Jenkins T. Large, Barry Wilton, G. Wilton-Jones.

Officers Of The Club

Honorary Secretary             M. WHEADON, 91 The Oval, Englishcoombe, Bath. Tel : BATH 713646

Honorary Treasurer             B. WILTON, ‘Valley View’, Venus Lane, Clutton, Nr. Bristol. Tele : TEMPLE CLOUD 52072

Caving Secretary                TIM LARGE, 15 Kippax Avenue, Wells, Somerset

Climbing Secretary             R. JENKINS, 10 Amberley Close, Downend, Bristol.

Hut Warden                        C. BATSTONE, 8 Prospect Place, Bathford, Bath..

Belfry Engineer                   J. DUKES, 4 Springfield Crescent, Southampton. SO1 6LE  Tele : (0703) 774649

Tacklemaster                     G. WILTON-JONES, ‘Ilenea’, Stonefield Road. Nap Hill, High Wycombe, Bucks. Tele : (024) 024 3534

B.B. Editor                         S.J. COLLINS, Lavender Cottage, Bishops Sutton, Nr. Bristol.  Tel : CHEW MAGNA 2915

Publications Editor              C. HOWELL, 131 Sandon Road, Edgebaston, Birmingham 17.  Tele : (021) 429 5549

B.B. Postal                        BRENDA WILTON  Address as for Barry

 

The views expressed by contributors to the Belfry Bulletin, including those of club officers, are not necessarily the views of the committee of the Bristol Exploration Club or the Editor, unless so stated.  The Editor cannot guarantee that the accuracy of information contained in the contributed matter, as it cannot normally be checked in the time at his disposal.