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QUODCUMQUE  FACIENDUM : NIMIS  FACIEMUS

Dates

Saturday March 1st    Climbing in the Pyrenees, an illustrated talk by ‘Kangy’ King.  7.30 p.m. at the Belfry

Easter,

            March 28th      Sleets Gill.

            March 29th      Pippikin.

            March 30th      Lancaster – Easegill

Editorial

Happy New Year

A very belated, but nevertheless well meant, Happy New Year to club members and all readers.  Owing to the usual series of mishaps, this B.B. - like the Christmas issue - is very late, but it is hoped that we will get back to sensible issue dates very shortly.

The B.B. in 1975

Only minor changes in layout are contemplated.  The list of club officers gets a full page, as many members have said how useful they find this repetitive but useful feature.  After a break for Christmas, both 'Round and About' and the regular monthly crossword re-appear.  Mike Wheadon has promised to write regularly on the social scene - for those members who like to know what is going on apart from caving. Incidentally, Mike is also hoping to be able to take over some of the production of the B.B. this year. One feature during the year will be a change of cover paper (not design).  It could not be introduced straight away, as its object is to save money - and this could not be done by throwing away our remaining stocks! Purists will, no doubt, be able to get spare covers if they want their years B.B. to look uniform.

Membership Secretary

The committee have voted Angie Dooley into this position.  She has not been co-opted.  All subs should be sent to The Membership Secretary, c/o The Belfry.

Albert Maine

The death of Albert Maine is reported in 'Round and About' (147).  In addition to what is said there, it might be appropriate to remember that the B.E.C. in particular owes Mr. Maine a debt of gratitude.  By allowing his barn to be used by cavers, he made it possible for many of the active – but homeless – post-war cavers to get to know each other and, as it so happened, to join the B.E.C.  By this means, we got members like the late Don Coase, ‘Sett’ – for many years the mainstay of the club on Mendip, ‘Pongo’ Wallis – one of the trustees of the Belfry and, unfortunately, your editor!

Tackle

We hear that the special committee, which the N.C.A. set up to look into tackle, is to recommend that standards be set up and that some sort of grant be sought for this exercise. While it is, perhaps, too early to react – since there will be some opportunity to discuss this at the next meeting of the Southern Council - there does seam be the beginning of a parallel between what I wrote in that article 'The future of Caving Clubs' and what is likely to actually happen.  During the year, we shall be publishing as much as we can sensibly get hold of on matters which could affect the control and future of caving and although it is perhaps a nuisance, we urge all cavers who care about the future of caving as we know it on Mendip to come along to meetings of the Southern Council and hear - and comment - on what is going on.  Four afternoons a year cooped up in Priddy Village Hall might prove a small price to pay for ensuring that caving goes the way that cavers want it to go!

Insurance and All That

Another ‘behind the scenes’ activity – this time in the direct interest of club members – is the meeting of the club sub-committee on matters affecting insurance.  The subject is being investigated at some depth – to make sure that we know where members stand in the event of a claim under the club’s insurance policy.  The information found and conclusions reached will be circulated to members as soon as this can be done.


 

Photographic Cave Surveying

A 'Chatty version' – according to the author, John Letheren of M.N.R.C. of a new technique which will be dealt with in greater detail in a future issue of 'Cave Notes'.

The general idea is to survey caves and mines quickly but with reasonable accuracy - much more accurately than 'sketch from memory' and much more quickly than with conventional surveying equipment.

The data required, from one point to the next, is range, bearing and elevation.  Range cannot be measured accurately with a photographic rangefinder as the angle subtended beyond a few yards is so small as to be quite un-measurable - so an alternative method is used.

The one hit on is to photograph something of known size, and measure the size of the image on the negative which, allowing for a small correction for focussing is inversely proportional to the distance of the object from the camera.  To take an extreme case, you could not measure the distance of the moon with a photographic rangefinder to better than 'between 30ft and infinity' but if you were to photograph the moon and measure the size of the image you could, knowing its diameter, find its distance to the same degree of accuracy as you could measure the diameter of the image, say to 1%. This then is the method used to measure range - although it is not necessary to know the dimensions of the object itself, only to compare it with an image taken at a known distance.

The device used consists of a horizontal wooden cross about ten inches each way with a vertical arm fixed to the centre of the cross also about ten inches high.  Each of these five arms (four horizontal and one vertical) has a small filament bulb at its end, and the measurements must be equal from bulb filament to bulb filament.  In addition there is an extra bulb on one arm to denote south.  This instrument, although we have built and used it, has as yet no name, but it is usually called the 'chandelier' for obvious reasons.  It is also fitted with a compass (used only to align the instrument - not for readings) and a spirit level tube on two of the horizontal arms for levelling.  The whole thing is mounted on a short tripod with a ball-joint head, and is connected by a short cable to a 6v. battery which stands on the ground near the tripod.  The camera is normally used with a 200rmn telephoto lens and is mounted on a longer tripod with a ball-joint head.  A 135mn lens would be adequate, but this is about the limit.

The survey team consists of one photographer and one chandelier setter.  The latter sets the chandelier level and north, and the former makes an exposure at 125th of a second at f8, giving no problems with either depth of focus or long exposure.  This records all the information needed to compute the range, bearing and elevation of the device relative to the camera or vice-versa. The camera is then moved to be ahead of the chandelier and the next exposure made, and so on.  The chandelier must be situated so that ALL the lamps are visible (quite easy in practice, although one must always consider the following shot as well as the one first being made) and in addition, the data is only valid if the camera is looking DOWN on the chandelier.  Reverse shots (i.e. those where the camera is looking back along the direction of surveying) are readily distinguished from forward shots by including a caving lamp in the corner of the picture for reverse shots. You then leapfrog wherever possible, keeping the camera always above the chandelier.  At the end of each traverse, one frame is marked with a close-up of the nearest caving lamp for identification purposes, and the survey then continues for the next section or traverse.

Providing one has sufficient cheap black-and-white film, that is all you have to do underground and it takes approximately one minute per leg.  The rest is done at home.  The film is developed and the negative set up (mount each frame in a cardboard frame which is numbered) and each picture (which is, of course, a series of black dots - it being a negative) is projected, square on, to a sheet of paper and the dots marked on the paper.  The first slide must be a reference shot of the chandelier taken from a measured distance.  This allows for the magnification of the projector etc. and is used as the basis for calculating range.  It need hardly be said that the shots are numbered on the sheets of paper also and that reverse shots are distinguished from forward shots.  The spacing between the North-South and East-West lamps are then measured (the units are irrelevant) and also the height from the centre to the top lamp.  Finally, all the data is shovelled into a handy computer (or calculator, which is quite feasible, but tedious) and out pops a survey.  In the computer programme I have written, each section is entered as either' 'open' or 'closed' and if closed, the computer recalculates the points to adjust out the closing error.

I will not deal with the mathematics here, as that is destined for a separate publication in the future. Nevertheless, the system is working, although a lot more experience is required.  Even so, it really does take only one minute per shot.

In the meantime, anyone thinking of trying out the method is welcome to the very simple details of the instrument and the mathematics.  It is quite feasible to use an electronic calculator if a computer is not available, but the latter is much quicker. I would like to close by thanking John Richardson (M.N.R.C.) for a good many trials (in both senses of the word) in the Coombe Down Mines to get the system working.

Editor's Note:     I have seen a closed traverse done by this method, the actual traverse being DRAWN by the computer as well as being calculated by it.  At present, this method is not as accurate as conventional accurate surveying methods, but its interest lies in its automated nature. With hand calculators of computer like complexity becoming available, one might be able to replace the camera with a TV camera and feed the dots straight in as electrical signals; store all the information in the hand computer; feed it, into a computer with a graphics attachment once outside the cave, and just wait for it to draw the survey! Perhaps we should run a 'Tomorrow's World' programme in the B.B.!


 

Christmas 1974

Following the write up on the club dinner, Mike Wheadon keeps us up-to-date on the social scene with this account of Christmas.

Following the success of the 1974 club dinner, a group of members decided to dine out for Christmas. Unfortunately further extensive enquiries incontrovertibly showed that the only hotels where a booking could be made were over the hill as regards cost.  Fortunately for the group, Patti Palmer is not without influence in certain catering circles and persuaded her brother (our club dinner chef) to attempt a repeat performance for our gathering at the Belfry.

On Christmas Eve, the residents started to gather at the Belfry and, at random times and for no apparent reason, seemed to be drawn to the Hunters where they were joined by other members intent on getting in a bit of elbow bending.  Drawing a discreet veil over such activities, some of the group got back to the Belfry at closing time to complete the decorations already started by Angie Dooley.  The motif was 'stars and bats' (Bertie of course) and in a short time everything that didn't move was suitably decorated.  A Christmas tree was produced and trimmed, the barrels tidied up, and presto! One completely transformed Belfry, which was quickly re-transformed when Angie received a stock whip for her first Christmas present.

On Christmas Day, the company gradually assembled at the local hostelry for a few aperitifs before eating.  The first to appear were the residents, Angie and Colin Dooley, John Dukes and Widley, Ken James, Andy Nichols, Keith Newbury (seeking temporary civilisation away from another club) then Keith Murray, Alan and Hilary followed closely by Mike and Maureen Wheadon, Zot, Jen, Mike and Patti.  Having been thrown out at closing time all adjourned to the Belfry where Patti organised setting up the boards.  By now, we were surrounded by Palmers and Laws (the chef's) children - Graham, Simon, Sarah, Cheryl, Kirstine and of course, Teresa.  With the tables set up, the Belfry looked like some baronial hall and all we had to do was to await the arrival of the food.  Fortunately there were a couple of barrels to take the edge off the waiting

Later, Arthur (the chef) arrived and his wife Judi who joined us for dinner, and in no time we were all seated at the table imbibing sherry as a prelude to: - Minestrone soup; Prawn cocktail; Turkey and/or Roast Beef with potatoes, sprouts etc., a choice of sweets including Guinness Trifle (for John W.) Christmas Pudding and such then cheese and biscuits and later - Gaelic Coffee and Mince Pies.  There were copious draughts of Red Rose or White wine to ease the meal on its way and after a couple of hours, a very replete company were settled round the 'Centre of the Universe' being entertained by the children displaying their multitude of presents.  Meanwhile, Arthur had performed a minor miracle and cleared the tables and washed up.  He was then persuaded to force down a couple of pints of beer, after which he went to sleep for a couple of hours.  General lethargy had now set in and was briefly lifted when Chris Batstone arrived. However, after several pints he too succumbed to the general lethargy.  A few bods from other clubs appeared briefly and later Brenda and Barrie Wilton (who had intended to dine with us but were forced into other plans) joined the gathering.  Eventually there was a move to totter up to the Hunters which some of us achieved. The others stayed behind to watch T.V. which had been brought up so that the children could be entertained (They didn't bother with it - they watched the B.E.C. instead.)

Boxing Day saw a very jaded collection of Belfry residents, and only the offer by Mike P. to buy them a round persuaded them to stagger to the Hunters for a lunchtime drink.  When the first round came up, Keith Murray swallowed his whole and demanded that all drink up so that he could buy another round.  At this stage, Chris Batstone, not wishing to be left out, swallowed his pint that Keith had just bought him and called a third round.  Thinking that closing time was approaching, each of the remainder of the group bought rounds as quickly as they could.

Matters were by now well out of control, and Alan Thomas and Arthur Laws joining the company didn't help very much since they too insisted on buying rounds and in no time at all the trestle table in the bar had about 40 pints on it all wishing to be drunk. Roger then announced that there was an extension until 2.30 p.m. and it was later calculated that the eight people had, by closing time, put away 125 pints of beer in one and a half hours. Having been thrown out (again) the company decided that it would be a good time to visit the Wessex to spread a bit of Christmas cheer and scrounge coffee.  For some reason or other, the Wessex were not overjoyed to see our gathering and were even more unimpressed when Mike P., with Angie's assistance, attempted to drain their barrel in one draught.  We did not get any coffee.

Boxing Day again saw the company gathered at the Hunters, re-living the past glorious lunchtime and demonstrating how the battle was fought.  At closing time we adjourned to the Belfry where Arthur and Patti organised a bubble-and-squeak supper which was followed by two slide shows - one by Mike P. showing the B.E.C. in the Pyrenees with Patti in various poses leaning on various bods, and a few caving slides (every picture tells a story) and the other show by Keith Newbury showing the laughing, smiling Wessex in various revolting poses (literally).  On this note ended Boxing Day.

The next event in the Christmas Calendar was Wig's bottle party which took place at the Wiggery on Sunday evening.  One point to note here was the perfect reproduction of the Rolling Stones on the hallowed hi-fi.

Strictly speaking, we have now ended the Christmas festivities, but I feel that New Years Eve was well worth a mention.  This was a SINGING evening with even more of the 'golden oldies' like Norman Petty, Alan and Carol Sandall Tom and Rusty, Joyce and Pete Franklin etc.  Although at some times the words seemed to go astray, and even Chris Batstone got them wrong - although he claimed it was the fault of the beer - it lasted until the witching hour and the traditional Auld Lang Syne in the road, after which a merry evening finally broke up.


 

Caves and Mines of Southern Wiltshire

An article by Andy Sparrow which perhaps supports the old adage 'Caves are where you find them'.

About fifteen miles west of Salisbury is an area of Portland and Purbeck rocks including several types of limestone.  The Salisbury Caving Group first inspected the area in 1972 and focussed its attentions on the Chilmark area where stone has been mined and quarried for hundreds of years.  Unfortunately, like so many other stone mines, the armed forces had put them to use and access was not possible.  Research showed that several mines extended at least three hundred feet into the valley side.

Up valley from this restricted area is a small wood in which we found a roomy mine entrance becoming too low after only twenty feet.  Thus defeated, we paid little attention to the area until February 1973, when I managed to gain access through a small, tight hole nearby, into a chamber and roomy passage.  Returning a week later with Rich Websell, we explored about a thousand feet of passage and named the find Chilmark Stone Mine.  Tiny decorated natural rifts are broken into in several places, and at one point a roof collapse has formed a sporting boulder ruckle.  Although the survey shown is only a Grade 1 sketch, a high grade survey has been begun by the S.C.G.

Later in 1973, we investigated another site a few miles to the west at Fonthill Gifford. Study of a 2½" O.S. map revealed an old quarry in a wood by a long artificial ornamental lake.  Our first investigation of the wood revealed more mines, this time with large, imposing entrance chambers.  However, they extended only fifty feet back into the hillside.  A subsequent inspection revealed a high natural rift with jammed boulders and a small choked tube with an airspace.  A start has been made excavating this.

Having located the small quarry shown on the map, we were interested to find several natural boulder-choked rifts.  Digging at one small pile of rubble quickly revealed a small tube blocked by a chert outcrop. This was later hammered away and the tube entered, but it got too tight after only six feet.

In June, Rich Websell and myself turned our attention to the largest rift in the quarry - about ten feet high and eight feet wide, thoroughly boulder-choked with some overhanging boulders balanced at the top.  We found a likely hole in the bottom left-hand corner and started digging away vast quantities of rocks and sand.  We soon uncovered a U-tube under an unsupported boulder, and after a little more digging, this hideously tight squeeze was passed.  Beyond, was twelve feet of roomy crawl between boulders ending in another choke, which we decided it was safer not to push.

In September we returned again and decided to enlarge a tiny passage visible behind the poised boulders at the top of the choke.  These were easily removed by tying a rope round them and pulling from below. Progress was then rapid and after digging out the floor for six feet we uncovered the top of a rift nine inches wide, widening visibly below.  Two more digging trips were made before this was passed, the next one being rather interesting since the entire right-hand wall of the dig collapsed - sending diggers scuttling in all directions as boulders tumbled after them.  In fact, this collapse proved a great help, since it made the new rift much more accessible.  When we returned, only a small amount of work was necessary before I was able to insert myself, feet first, into the rift and slowly worm my way down.

After a considerable effort I managed to get my chest through, while my feet kicked about in thin air with no indication of how far beneath me the floor was.  To my unspeakable relief, the floor proved to be only about seven feet beneath the squeeze, and I dropped into a section of fluted rift passage between boulder chokes.  The choke behind me proved to connect with the ten foot crawl, while a crawl beneath the other choke soon became too low.  A start has been made connecting the two caves so as to facilitate further digging.  They are obviously two parts of the same rift passage, to which we have been given the name of Ammonite Rift, after a fine example of that fossil just inside the lower entrance.

Anyone foolish enough to wish to visit this most unusual cave or Chilmark Stone Mine is advised to get in contact with me, or other members of the Salisbury Caving Group.

Editor's Note: Andy's address is: - 2 Bounds Green Road, Bounds Green, London N.11.


 

Round and About

A Monthly Miscellany

Compiled by 'Wig'

139.      January 31st.  Does this date mean anything to you?  It should! Subscriptions are now due.  £2.50 for full members, £3.50 for Joint members and £1.75 for Junior members.  Send your subscriptions to The Membership Secretary, c/o The Belfry Wells Rd, Priddy , Somerset.

140.      Alan Williams.  Does anyone know his address?  His B.B's have been returned from his Newport address.

141.      Swildons Hole.  The W.C.C. book will be added to the library as soon as it is published.  Invitations to purchase a copy are now open to non-Wessex members.  Price £12 (leather bound) and £9 (Rexine bound).  Orders to Phil Davies, Wessex Cave Club, Upper Pitts, Priddy, Somerset.

142.      Club Publications.  A full range is kept at the Belfry and obtainable from the Hut Warden.  Those buying through the post should obtain copies through Chris Howell, 131 Sandon Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham.  Please add 10p for packing and postage.

143.      Belfry Lectures.  Following Kangy's lecture and later in March, Chris Hawkes will be talking on Archaeological finds in caves.  How to remove them; when to leave them to specialists and some notes on the Westbury Bone Fissures.

144.      EGONS exchange.  The latest exchange of magazines is with the Exploration Group of North Somerset.  A basically chatty club journal with an alert eye on the political situation in the regional bodies.  On this subject, the Wessex Journal has reprinted a. paper by Roger Sutcliffe on the history of the Northern Council and the reasons for their decision to allow access only to members and associate member clubs.  Incidentally, recent issues of the Wessex Journal have included a serial written by Fred Davies on the Cowsh Aven epic.  Though written in the usual Davies style - concise yet humorous - did it really need to be that long (at least six parts)?

145.      From other journals.  The latest 'Sottoterra1 (no 37) includes reports on the Bologna Club discoveries. The Cambridge U.C.C. Journal for 1974 includes a report of their 1973 Pyrenees expedition. The B.C.R.A. bulletin includes details of the Quaking Pot extension and details of the Gar Parau Foundation constitution.  Plymouth Caving Group Journals Nos 56 - 59 are now in the library, as is the latest U.B.S.S. Proceedings (Reviewed in this B.B.).

146.      News from members abroad.  Colin Priddle has sent us an article for the B.B. and Sybil is likely to be back in England in April this year.

147.      Farmer Maine. There can be few members of the club who do not know farmer Maine.  I am very sorry to have to report that following an illness which necessitated his being taken to Wells Cottage Hospital just before Christmas, he died in January this year.  The funeral, at Priddy Church on the 18th of January, was attended by representatives of many Mendip caving clubs.  At his own request, there were no flowers, but he asked for donations to Priddy Church, to which the club has responded.  It was. perhaps, Maine's example of friendly and helpful co-operation between landlord and caver that may well have laid the foundation for the generally good relations that have existed on Mendip in this respect.

148.      Donations to the Library.  Our thanks to Garth, Andy Nichols, Tim Large and others for donations to the club library. Incidentally, there are a number of library lists for sale at the Belfry price 10p.  A valuable aid to those who want to study the contents of the club library at their leisure.

149.      Cave notes 1974.  Is out! The material includes two new surveys of Mendip caves (Ludwell and Flowerpot, Hollowfield) and notes relating to cave surveying.  A well at Bathford.  Trespass problems.  Sea Caves of North Devon.  28 pages, price 3Op.  Only 100 copies are available, so get your order to Chris Howell NOW before they run out.

149.      Shower Improvements.  John Dukes and Pat Cronin have modified the shower system at the Belfry by alteration of the wiring system.  This allows the Hut Warden to arrange for the tanks to be on throughout the weekend, enabling cavers to have showers without having to wait.

150.      Lifelines.  Graham Wilton-Jones is ordering a new supply of lifelines to replace those that we have in service at the moment.

151.      Sub-Committee meets.  The first meeting of the sub committee set up by this year’s committee following questions raised by the A.G.M. met at Alfie's on the 22nd of January.  Many questions were raised and all members are investigating various aspects of the problem.  The real point that became clear very soon after discussion began is that the simple questions asked at the A.G.M. are really extremely complex. It can also be noted, without speaking out of turn, that our third party liability cover is not all it could be.  The sub-committee meets again on April 9th 1975 at Alfie’s.  Members who were present at the first meeting were Alfie, Andy Nichols, Joan Bennett, Bob White and Wig.

152.      Withyhill Survey.  This survey is now completed and at the printers for photo-reduction.  Copies will be available at the Belfry in the very near future.  The survey notes will appear in the February B.B.

153.      Increased Postal Rates.  It seems likely that some discussion will take place during the year regarding the monthly posting of the B.B. to members.  The present postal expenses of £80 are heavy enough, but when the 5p postage becomes effective, the postal bill for the B.B. will increase to about £115 per year and will be as great as the full production cost (assuming no donations of papers etc.)  Members who can collect their B.B. from Barrie or Mike Palmer are asked to do so whenever possible. The hand delivery system will have to be improved if a monthly delivery is to continue.  Another scheme would involve members paying an. additional 18p to their subscription to cover the increase.  Think about it, and any other scheme and let the editor know.


 

Book Review

U.B.S.S. Proceedings Vol 13, No 3. September 1974.

The U.B.S.S. Proceedings, an annual publication, may occasionally lose in topicality, but that is more than made up for by the thoroughness and detail of the contents. The 1974 volume is well up to the U.B.S.S.’s traditional standard.

The reports are split equally between archaeological and speleological work.  The archaeological articles deal excavations on the river terraces at Ham Green, Bristol and in a quarry at Holly Lane, Clevedon (both rather specialised subjects) also work on the Roman settlement at Charterhouse done in the 1960's and an excellent paper by Bishop on the Middle Pleistocene deposits in a bone fissure in Westbury quarry.  The paper is an interim one since work continues, but there is already evidence that Westbury may be the earliest recorded site of man in Britain.

The caving section begins with two recently explored caves in county Clare - McGarin's Cave and Formoyle East Cave - both comparatively insignificant, but models of thorough writing up.  The account of Manor Farm Swallet (Stanton and Smart) is admittedly a year after the event, but material is new.  There is a small but well set out grade 5 survey.  The report of the 1973 expedition to Yugoslavia however, is a great disappointment through no fault of the Society's.  The Yugoslav government's decision to ban foreigners from all but show caves meant that any exploration had to be in remote areas with no organised local contact. You can hardly expect success under these conditions.

The two dozen or so photographs, plans and illustrations spread about the 1Q7 pages are all of a high standard.  At £1.50 a copy it may be a little expensive for the average caver, but essential to a club library.

B.E.C. Ball Pens.

A limited quantity of Ball Pens are now available.  These are stamped BRISTOL EXPLORATION CLUB on one side and have THE BELFRY, PRIDDY TEL: WELLS 72126 on the other.  They are made by the Harris Pencil Co and are retractable with a toughened ball and detachable handle.  They are available in red, blue and black, the pen colour being the same as the ink inside.  Price only 5p each.  At present these are held by Alfie, but arrangements will be made to have them available at the Belfry if demand warrants it.

Don't forget that surveys; B.E.C. Caving reports (Including the first edition of CAVE NOTES); spares and library lists are all available at the Belfry.  Arrangements are in hand for further supplies of car badges and club ties.


 

Monthly Crossword – Number 53

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Across:

1. Crumpled by boulders, perhaps. (7)
6. Water was once the Forty in Swildons. (5)
7. Definitely not on! (3)
8. Rare vests used to find ways. (9)
10. Green not far from belfry. (3)
11. Valleys or holes. (5)
13. Tugs on rope – or whistles for them. (7)

Down

2. Later addition to Mendip mineshafts, perhaps. (3)
3. Griddled – a way to great things in G.B. (6,3)
4. Could describe water or rock structures underground. (5)
5. Puts another detonator in – or decides that it’s too risky? (7)
6. The Loop, perhaps? – No, it’s further north than G.B. (7).
9. ..and, if roofed over, they become these. (5)
12. Cavers body? (1,1,1)

Solution to Last Month’s Crossword

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Solution to Andy Nichols' S Christmas Crossword Puzzle

 

Solution To Alan Thomas's Christmas Puzzle

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Club Headquarters

The Belfry, Wells Rd, Priddy, Wells, Somerset. Telephone WELLS 72126

Club Committee

Chairman          S.J. Collins

Minutes Sec      G. Wilton-Jones

Members           C. Dooley, J. Dukes, C. Howell, D. Irwin, T. Large, A. Nicholls, G. Oaten, B. Wilton.

Officers Of The Club

Honorary Secretary             D.J IRWIN, Townsend Cottage, Townsend, Priddy, Wells Som.  Tel : PRIDDY 369

Honorary Treasurer             B. WILTON, ‘Valley View’, Venus Lane, Clutton, Nr. Bristol.

Caving Secretary                A. NICHOLLS, c/o The Belfry

Assist Cav. Sec.                 T. LARGE, 15 Kippax Avenue, Wells, Somerset

Climbing Secretary             G. OATEN, 32 St. Marks Road, Easton, Bristol. Tele : BRISTOL 551163

Hut Warden                        C. DOOLEY, 51 Ommaston Road., Harbourne, Birmingham 17. Tele :  (021)  427 6122

Belfry Engineer                   J. DUKES, 4 Springfield Crescent, Southampton. SO1 6LE  Tele : (0703) 774649

Tacklemaster                     G. WILTON-JONES, ‘Ilenea’, Stonefield Road. Nap Hill, High Wycombe, Bucks. Tele : (024) 024 3534

B.B. Editor                         S.J. COLLINS, Lavender Cottage, Bishops Sutton, Nr. Bristol. Tel : CHEW MAGNA 2915

Publications Editor              C. HOWELL, 131 Sandon Road, Edgebaston, Birmingham 17.  Tele : (021) 429 5549

B.B. Postal                        BRENDA WILTON  Address as for Barry

Spares                               T. LARGE,  Address already given

MEMBERSHIP SECRETARY…Mrs A. DOOLEY, c/o THE BELFRY.

TO WHOM ALL SUBS SHOULD B SENT.  SUBS NOW DUE!!