QUODCUMQUE  FACIENDUM : NIMIS  FACIEMUS

Editorial

Lifelines

The recent accident in Lamb Leer unfortunately provides an example of a type of accident which might well have been minimised or even avoided had full life lining techniques been in use.  The fact that the accident occurred to a caver of many years standing on Mendip emphasises the fact that every caver, however experienced or fit, can ‘come off’ for some reason or another, given bad luck.

There is, or course, an understandable tendency for cavers of experience to minimise the use of life lines.  Perhaps the accident will serve to impress on us the need for the grater use of such preventative measures.

Thin End?

The strong possibility that Somerset will require the B.A.C.I. certificate for all leaders under its control from 1976 onwards - and by implication will be rejecting the training scheme adopted and published by the Council of Southern Caving Clubs - could be seen as a first step towards that state of affairs portrayed in the Christmas B.B. last year, in which the fictitious University of Charterhouse made its appearance.  Having said this, it should not be implied that there is anything intrinsically wrong with B.A.C.I.  The point being made is that of restriction of freedom of choice.  In this connection, it is worth noting that the approach of the C.S.C.C. scheme, 'Caving for Beginners' differs considerably from that of B.A.C.I. and that the choice is therefore not one between two certificates as between two methods of approach.  Indeed, there is no reason, in theory as far as can be seen, why a particular caver giving advice and training under the C.S.C.C. scheme could not be a B.A.C.I. certificate holder.  There is, however, a world of difference between a state of affairs in which he MAY hold such a certificate and one in which he MUST.  The C.S.C.C., quite rightly in the editorial opinion of the B.B., place their first priority on experience.  As an older, experienced climber is reputed to have said to a younger man proudly displaying a certificate, "That's all well, but can you abseil from it?"

Round And About

Apart from a small editorial comment in the column itself it seems appropriate to congratulate 'Wig' editorially for reaching his century this month by the production of his hundredth topic under, what has become by now, the familiar heading of Round and About.

Many people have said how useful they have found this feature of general information, and I would like to add my personal thanks coupled with the hope that he may go on for a very long time to come.

“Alfie”


 

At the Belfry - A Flowery Spiel

An account of some of the happenings at the Belfry in the earlier part of this year - by Nigel Taylor

Spring and nearly, ever so nearly, summer is in the air at the Belfry now.  And with the spring come new flowers and new faces, but nevertheless old shoots and faces have been popping up in and around the Belfry. Chris Falshaw and family, Mike Wheadon, Pat Ifold and family, and many others.

Again, there has been an early showing of perennial hardies, such as Sett and family, Mary and Pete Ham and family and many, many more.

Back in the autumn, Albert Francis was even seen at the Belfry sleeping there for the first time ever! This was due to acute hop poisoning after an excellent N.H.A.S.A. dinner!

Club members actively participating in various digging activities such as Hollowfield and Bucket Hole have been numerous and the club's licensed explosive users have been employed gardening many earthy systems.

The Belfry car park has been re-graded by mysterious loads of quarry stone - connected somehow with an even more mysterious Hut Warden.  The Belfryites have also been working hard on the site, and a night exercise from 9.30 p.m. through to 6.30 a.m. saw the erection of a large M.R.O. store and new Tackle Store facilities.

However, all is not roses at Belfry Avenue.  Problems of rusting tanks arose, and were ably dealt with by Rod Hobbs and Tim Large one weekend recently.  Problems of sewage disposal have also reared up and threatened to drop us all in the fertiliser.  These, too, have (we hope) been overcome.

Due to two accidents in the attic roof, repairs were necessary, and these were efficiently executed by ‘Jock Orr Plastering Industries Ltd.’ In general, members and guests have all mucked in well with the problems and given fair periods of their time.

Belfry regulars include, at present, Andy 'Groper' Nicholls, Zot, Martin Grass and female company, Colin and Angela Dooley, Chris Backstone, John Dukes and 'Streaking for Deakin' Sue from Southampton - and of course your scribe, Mr. Nigel.

On a more serious note. If you or someone is bitten by a snake, immobilise the limb - treat as for fracture - do NOT tourniquet, DO NOT allow victim to move - Do reassure and comfort victim - DO call 999 - DO NOT take victim to Wells.  Ham Green hospital in Bristol is the only one in the vicinity with serum - but it is often not necessary.


 

Open Letter To the Club

Editor's Note:     This threatens to be a B.B. written entirely by Nigel Taylor!  In this open letter, he has some forthright comments to make on the Long Term plans.

The Long Term Planning Committee have done it again!  Yes, they have produced - not a representative report but another diatribe! They have completely missed the point, or rather the points of necessity.  A detailed account has been drawn up, telling us how more paper talk and ensuing paperwork will be created - and this is capped by a list which is not so much 'Long Term' as short sighted!

Now to the 'winter of my discontent':-

List 1 contains the order of priority of items in groups, and my comments are as under: -

  1. Comfort.
    I thought the B.E.C. was a caving club, not a ruddy 5 star listed A.A./R.A.C. hotel.
  2. Rubbish storage and Waste Disposal.
    This itself is rubbish, since we now have 4 dustbins and I personally come up midweek if the local farmer cannot undertake the job on the fortnightly dustbin day.  Furthermore, I have recently been pressing the new Mendip District Council to drive up to the Belfry to pick up the bins.
  3. Cooking Facilities and Food Storage
    With 8 gas rings and one grill, and one new oven, are they really that bad for a hut which sleeps a maximum of 25?  In any case, the utilisation is usually in the 80% bracket with a fair proportion of the users not even contemplating cooking each and every meal.  As for food storage, what have successive committees done about the lockers?  (First mooted by me over 18 months ago at a November Committee meeting.)
  1. Eating.
    How does the sub-committee propose to improve this?.....Aaaaagh…….an answer emerges…… intravenous feeding!
  2. Washing up, crockery storage, etc.
    What is up with the shelves and cupboards Norman Petty made?  They open the doors?  Or their eyes?

That has withered away the first 5 ludicrous and apparently highest priority items.  Having scrubbed these erroneous 'priorities' one is then left with something of substance from which one may prepare a sensible list ( if one is to have such a list at all)

    1. (No 8) Washing self and Shower Facility.
    2. (No 9) Charging Facilities.  Surely this is a vital requisite for a caving hut in these days of frequent digging and caving trips?
    3. (No 7) Changing and Drying of clothes.  The need for this is plain for all to see and comprehend.

4.       (No 6) Workshop facility.  For the lifeblood of a caving, climbing - or even canoeing club, a place where tackle, digging gear, tools, canoes or whatever can be made - bearing in mind the communal skills and knowledge - producing a product in a sensible and well-equipped area at the club H.Q.

5.       (No 12) Administration Facility.  In this day and age, when large clubs must need to run their huts on business lines (especially when one is dealing with monies and goods belonging to the club, let alone the £15,000 or so of club hut) the need for proper administration facilities rears its ugly head, let's not play the ostrich!

6.       (No 14) The Loft.  Ideas for improvement to this are often aired down at the Belfry. I refer the reader to the B.B. Number 303. (See, Editor, the B.B. is used for references!)  The club is wasting valuable, utilisable space up there and if it embarks on extraneous expenditure on the sub-committee's proposals then such potential will be wasted due to lack of funds or their allocation.

7.       (No 13) The Library.  Here, only a carpenters skill and club finance are the requisites to transform this 'near shell' into the condition merited by both its content and the valiant efforts of the club librarian Dave (Wig) Irwin.

 

8.       (No 10) Sleeping Accommodation.  Here there is even less scope for the necessary improvements to be made.  However, I feel that women club members might prefer, or deserve, better feminine conditions, yet, to back track, we must not forget that this is a caving club and basically composed of males (But perhaps I'm just a Chauvinist pig!)

9.       (No 11) Parking.  Even though I realise that soon we can expect club members Range Rovers; Lamborghinis; Daimlers; Rolls and the like will be replaced by perhaps H.S.125's S.A./B.E.C. Concorde’s and an array of resplendent V.S.T.O.L. craft, I feel sure that there are not many of us who would like to see a shiny NICE macadam or LOVELY concrete car park, of course resplendent with DIVINE tints of white or yellow lines.  Besides, I, for one, don't want to have to read the club Car Park Attendant's Report before the next A.G.M. - I will find my own tedious enough!

One last point - I wonder if the sub-committee could be kind enough to tell me why in the May B.B., No 319:-

Three further lists will be compiled:

1.                    First to show order of priority of groups of items.

2.                    Extent of improvements as costings of expense & labour.

3.                    (Last but not least!)  Order of priority of items.

Please, oh PLEASE, what's the difference, between list 1 and 3, or is it to cater for inflation presumably mentioned in the intervening list 2 perhaps?

I know it is easy to knock a subject as I have just done but I hope the reader; the sub-committee and the general committee will appreciate that I have endeavoured to put forward counter-proposals in this letter, and I will also have shown this letter to the sub-committee's chairman Graham Wilton-Jones to give him a chance to challenge any points that I have proposed.  This letter is not under any circumstances to be taken as an attempt to challenge either Graham's views as chairman, nor for that matter to challenge the integrity of the general committee or any of its officers.  This meant purely as a thought-provoking article on points which the editor invited comment!

It may be questioned as to why I did not put these views forward as Hut Warden, well, this was not possible.  The committee, for some reason, decided that the Hut Warden should not have a sub-committee say in the proposals.  I say this in answer to several queries raised to me on this point.  So I must further stress that these are not the B.E.C. Hut Warden's views, but my own - purely as an interested member and regular user of the Belfry.

Yours in the Club Spirit,

Nigel P. Taylor.

Editor's Note:

As Nigel points out, I invited comment, since the way the club decides to spend its money on the Belfry is a subject which should interest most - if not all - B.E.C. members. Perhaps other members might like to make points - if not to the B.B., then to Graham who, I am sure, will be pleased to hear about as many points of view as possible to help him in what is after all, a very difficult job.

Another Reminder about the A.G.M. and Dinner

SATURDAY OCTOBER 5th

A.G.M. starts at 10.30 a.m. at the Belfry.

Dinner will be at the Blue School at WELLS – just down the bottom of Rockham.

FULL DETAILS IN NEXT B.B.!


 

The Deneholes of Hangman’s Wood

A description of a little-known type of underground feature written by Derek Sanderson and Roger Wing.

The Deneholes are phenomena which may be of interest to cavers - particularly as some of them can still be explored.  Indeed, some members may be familiar with them whilst others may merely have read about them.  They are found in a number of counties in the South East of England and also in parts of France, and one of the main concentrations is in Essex, occurring in the comparatively small area known as Hangman's Wood, Greys.  There is a soft spot in the hearts of the authors for the Deneholes, as they represent an early landmark in their caving careers.

DESCRIPTION. Basically, all Deneholes consist of a single shaft dropping vertically from the surface through the thin topsoil of the region and the underlying Thanet Sand, and terminating in a chamber in the chalk beneath, which may be at a depth of up to eighty feet.  These shafts vary in diameter, but are usually between ten and twelve feet wide and are reminiscent of a well shaft.  The chambers at the bottom vary in shape from simple bell like chambers to more complex chamber patterns.  The Deneholes found at Crayford, Kent are of the simple bell-like variety, whilst those at Stankey are more irregular.  The most common form of chamber is the 'double trefoil' shape as is found at Hangman's Wood.  Originally, there were many shafts at Greys, but now there are only two shafts open (70' ladder required for each).  Below is a network of chambers interconnected by short rabbit-hole-like crawls.  All is dry and mostly horizontal.

AGE.  To establish their age is by no means easy, but one may hazard a guess from various pieces of evidence.  In 1884 and 1887, the Deneholes complex of Greys was fully investigated on behalf of the Essex Field Club by two of its members - T.V. Holmes and W. Cole.  An extensive report was published in which they discussed some of their findings. They found, for instance, pieces of Niedermendig lava which was quarried in the Eifel district of Germany and not imported into this country until the arrival of the Romans.  This, in itself, is of dubious value, though it may add weight to other evidence.

The most useful evidence concerning age comes from the bones found in the deposits that have inevitably settled at the bottom of the shafts.  These include remains of sheep; badger; ox; dog; horse and man.  What is significant is the total absence of red deer and wolf, which were apparently common in the time of the Normans.

One may suggest, then, that the Deneholes were dug soon after the arrival of the Normans, and this seems to be the conclusion arrived at by Baker when he wrote, '…the assumption that they existed in Saxon times will hold no more water than a chalk Denehole would.' (Caving, p102).  They do, however, predate the trees which grow around them.

REASON FOR EXISTENCE. This leads to the engaging problem of why they are there, and several theories have been put forward over the years.

  1. The shafts are, in fact, natural.  This is a recent theory.  What has been supposed is that a cavity has been formed in the chalk bed by percolating water in a similar manner to that which occurs in Limestone.  This cavity is formed close to the top of the chalk layer.  The theory goes that eventually the roof of the cavity meets the underside of the layer of Thanet sand above, and this drains through like an egg-timer to leave a cylindrical shaft dropping into a semi-filled chamber in the chalk beneath.

    No matter how feasible this theory may seem, it cannot hope to explain the ‘double trefoil’ shape of the chambers.  Add to this the problem of balancing the infill with the volume of the shaft, and the theory loses credibility - regardless of whether such a formation process is at all feasible.
  2. An equally implausible view is that they were gold mines.  1705, a Dr. Pert wrote a Natural History of Oxfordshire, in passing, he referred to the Deneholes as 'the gold mine of Cunobeline in Essex.'
  3. That they were flint mines.  There are several points against this view.  Firstly, a band of flint can be seen in both the open shafts of Hangman's Wood, but this flint has not been touched.  Secondly, there are no signs of debris either inside or outside the Deneholes, and this would be the first time a flint mine had been cleared up.
  4. That they were Roman burial chambers.  Some burial urns were found by a Mr. Neeson, but not in the Deneholes of Hangman's Wood, and both the dating and design of the chambers run against this view.
  5. That they were cave dwellings.  Clearly, this is wrong.  Cave dwellings are invariably littered with the remains left by the inhabitants.  No such remains have been found in Hangman's Wood.
  6. That they were places of refuge.  According to Baker, this theory seems to have gained weight from the fact that locally, the word 'Denehole' is pronounced 'Danehole' implying a hiding place from the Danes.  However, several commentators, including Baker, have observed that the word is derived from the Anglo-Saxon word 'Denn' which simply means 'Cave' or 'den'.  Also, the nature of the Deneholes themselves suggests that they are the last place that one would wish to use as a refuge.  Once in, it would be an easy matter to become trapped.
  7. That they are pitfalls, or some form of animal trap.  Clearly, this is not a feasible theory, as the Deneholes are too elaborate in construction.
  8. That they were granaries.  This theory was much favour by Holmes and Cole, and they arrived at this conclusion by drawing an analogy between the Deneholes and other under ground constructions which are definitely silos.  However, where these silos are concerned, there has always been an abundance of evidence as to their use - evidence which the Deneholes have not displayed.
  9. That they were chalk mines, either for local marling or for commercial uses.  This theory seems to be the most likely, and was accepted by Baker, though a few questions may still spring to mind.  Firstly, why mine chalk at Hangman's Wood when there is a large outcrop of the rock barely two miles away?  There may be several possible answers to this, such as the cost or inconvenience of transport, or different ownership of the land where the outcrop occurs.  Secondly, why are the chambers shaped the way they are?  Baker attempts to explain the trefoil shape in terms of how far a bucket on the end of a rope will swing from the main shaft, but this is not completely satisfactory.  Rather they are shaped in this way for purposes of structure.  Some of the walls between chambers of one shaft and another are only a matter of feet thick, so they have been dug with a sense of precision.  There is very little evidence of collapse which implies that the diggers knew when to stop digging 'one chamber and start another.  The trefoil shape may be the natural outcome of the maximum removal of chalk with the minimum of risk.

SIGNIFICANCE OF AGE. It may have been noted that the Deneholes at Greys were tentatively dated as post-Norman, while elsewhere Mr. Meeson found some Roman urns suggesting a pre-Norman date.  The conclusion to be drawn from this is that not all Deneholes were dug in the same period and that they were dug when and where necessary.  This would imply that, whatever their purpose was, it was an agricultural or industrial one rather than being the result of an invasion or some other occurrence which can be accurately dated.

ACCESS.  Access is controlled by Thurrock U.D.C. who issues a descent licence for those who are prepared to abide by a number of simple rules and fill in an insurance slip.  Address to write to is: Recreation Manager, Recreation Department, Blackshots Lane, Grays, Essex, RM13 2JU.  There is a lot of serious research still to be done in connection with Deneholes.

References

Caving (E.A. Baker)
Forgotten Thameside (Glyn H. Morgam) 1951.
Deneholes and other Chalk Excavations (Rev. J.W. Haynes)
Journal of Royal Anthropological Institute.39,1909.
Victoria County History of Essex. (G. Gould.)
Essex Field Club Report. (T.V. Holmes & W. Cole) Essex
Naturalist. Vol 1,1887.

 

 


 

Round and About

A Monthly Miscellany, by Wig

  1. Hollowfield.  Martin Bishop, Pat Cronin et al. have just about ended their activities at Flowerpot.  Digging at various sites was proving difficult.  A survey, drawn by 'Wig' will appear in Caving Report Number 18, to be published in September.  The cave is about 250 feet long and some 50 feet deep.  An essentially phreatic cave with some later vadose modification in the lower section. Stal. formations are present, the best being located at the top of the 12 foot pothole leading to the low bedding chamber at the far end of the known cave.  Although small, the discovery of this cave focuses attention again to a neglected area.  A sketch plan is shown below:-

The editor apologises for the non-inclusion of the sketch plan. The plan will be will be included in next month’s B.B.

  1. Jugoslavia.  A note appeared in a recent B.R.C.A, Bulletin stating that the Jugoslavian government has now forbidden foreign cavers from visiting caves in their country.  This applies to all cavers, whether visiting caves by themselves or with Jugoslav nationals.  Show caves are exempted.
  2. Ludwell Survey.  On the 10th July, 1974 a party of divers and dry land cavers surveyed Ludwell Cave to B.C.R.A. grade 5 (Sump to Grade 3) and the survey with background notes on recent activities at this site will appear in Caving Report Number 18.  A C.R.G. grade 3 survey appeared in the B.E.C. Caving Report No 9 several years ago.  The dry cave survey was carried out by 'Wig', John (Bath C.G.) and John Hutchinson.  The sump was surveyed by Martin Bishop, Ken James, Neil Rigilani and Pete Eckford.  The outflow of water from the Ludwell sump was merely a trickle, much to the surprise of the divers.
  3. Cuthbert’s 21st Anniversary Trip.  Invitations will be going out soon to various cavers to join in the celebrations.  The date, 4th September 1974.  The time, 7.00.p.m. at the Belfry.  Champagne at the Great Gour.  Anyone else interested in making up a second party should contact Kangy King at 22 Parkfield Rank, Pucklechurch, Bristol.  The party leader will be Roy Bennett - one of the first to descend the Entrance Rift in 1953.  Woolies will be the disorder of the day and the route through the cave will be Entrance Rift; Arête; Wire Rift; Waterfall and Wet pitches; Bypass; Stal Pitch, Gour Hall and Duck.  More details later.
  4. B.E.C. Rescue List.  The current list is very much out of date, and so Andy Nicholls (Caving Sec.) and Dave Turner (B.E.C. Team Leader) are compiling a new one.  Members wishing to be included in this list should contact either Andy or Dave giving brief details of experience; special knowledge (medical, localities in or out of caves etc.) transport, work and home phone numbers etc. AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.  Whilst on the subject of rescue lists, two practice rescues are being organised later on this year.  The two sites chosen are the top series of Longwood and the annual Cuthbert’s in November.  Andy and Dave will be organising these events and M.R.O. wardens will be invited to observe the proceedings.
  5. Winter Evenings at the Belfry.  Apart from the usual jollities at the Belfry, one or two more serious events will be taking place.  It is hoped to arrange a FIRST AID course with one of the M.R.O. doctors or the Ambulance men.  Dates and times are still to be arranged and details will appear soon in the B. B. - so keep your eyes skinned.  We are hoping to extend invitations to other clubs on Mendip, thus ensuring a full house.  In addition to the course, several sessions of practice tying the M.R.O. carrying sheet will take place at the Belfry on Sunday mornings.  Details will appear in the next B.B.  Arrangements for the more conventional lectures are well under way, and two speakers have so far been fixed to give talks: -

The Pyrenees - Kangy King.           Ballooning over the Alps - Tom Sage

Again, more details later.  Anyone knowing anyone who can give an interesting talk should contact Wig.

  1. Sea Caves in North Devon.  Earlier this year, Graham Wilton-Jones and Dave Irwin paid a visit to Saunton Sands and Cronde Bay in North Devon.  Over twenty sites of caving interest were visited and those that could be entered were sketch surveyed.  The caves at Saunton are in sandstone along an unconformity with the underlying vertical beds of shales (Pilton beds.)  The caves at Baggy Point are wholly in the shales and are quite large.  One, Whiting Hole, has not been entered, although local legend says it is of a very considerable length.  A detailed paper, with the surveys, is being published in Caving Report No 18.
  2. Inventory.  The committee have at long last decided to produce an inventory of our property - from equipment such as typewriters to digging tools.  This will be presented to the club at the A.G.M. and/or in a future B.B.  Anyone holding any item of club equipment should contact Wig with the details.
  3. Annual Dinner and A.G.M.  The A.G.M. is to be held at the Belfry at 10.30 a.m. on Saturday 5th October 1974 and the DINNER will be held in Wells - details of venue, price etc later.  This is a reminder just in case you haven't read the adverts in the B.B!
  4. Round and About.  The Editor has slipped this one in unbeknowing to 'Wig' to draw attention to the amount of useful information disseminated in this regular B.B. feature and promises not to interfere again until the next century is reached!
  5. Sunday Digging.  Digging has started again in Cuthbert’s in sump I.  If you feel like getting up early and being ready to descend the cave at 9.30 - you're welcome.  Some surveying trips are also arranged.
  6. Holidays.  Two parties are away to the continent - one with Martin Bishop, Liz, Dog, Ken James et al. are off to Northern Italy and a second party off to the Pyrenees including Andy Nicholls, John Dukes, Graham W-J etc.  In each party is a possible I.D.M.F. candidate, so look forward to their B.B. contributions that form part of the conditions of grants from the fund.
  7. Dinner again.  In addition to the entertainment that is being arranged for after the dinner, a small exhibition is being installed showing some of the latest surveys and publications available.  Also included will be a selection of interesting items recently added to the library - including the St. Cuthbert’s Minery Ledger and the Longbottom Diaries of 1934-1937.  There will also be a publications stand at the A.G.M.
  8. Surface Digging.  Vee Swallet is the latest site of interest.  Barry Wilton and others are gently probing this old B.E.C. site.  Last dug in the early '60's by Mo Marriott et al., several interesting flints, arrow heads and axes were uncovered there.  A more detailed account of the dig is to be found in B.E.C. Caving Report No 6.
  9. Resolutions.  Members having items which they want discussed in the form of resolutions at the A.G.M. are advised to start thinking about them now - although they can, in fact, be brought up at the start of the A.G. M. itself.  I have had a plea from the minute taker for people PLEASE to write their resolutions on reasonably sized pieces of paper - not on tiny little slivers of paper, which present quite a problem to store afterwards.

Some Reminders.

Martin Bishop would like any member’s ideas on decorating the living room at the Belfry.  Dave Irwin would like to remind library users to return the books promptly after use.  Please remember to SIGN for all tackle – always.  Those interested in long term rent of lockers in the Belfry should let Nigel know.  Barry will accept Bankers Orders for subs, but let him know about it or you might be charged twice.


 

Monthly Crossword – Number 48

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Across:

1. Second letter sprite and short railway make caving H.Q. (6)
6. B.E.C.’s. (4)
7. Heard, perhaps in large chamber. (4)
8. Regains consciousness. (5)
9. ‘Go Straight…’ is motto of U.B.S.S. (2)
10. Thus. (2)
11. Useful caving aid – though not flaming nowadays! (5)
12. Progress slowly and imperially. (4)
13. Has been used as water transport in caves. ( 4 or 2,2)
14. A very Southern Cave club. (3,1.1.1)

Down

2. A helictite could be this, or a club character (9)
3. New Mendip cave is welt proof! (9)
4. Risky Hero?  (Up north perhaps!) (9)
5. Climbs up rope with aid. (9)

Solution to Last Month’s Crossword

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I

 

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Club Committee

The Belfry, Wells Rd, Priddy, Wells, Somerset. Telephone WELLS 72126

Chairman          S.J. Collins

Minutes Sec      G. Wilton-Jones

Members           M. Bishop, D.J. Irwin, B. Wilton, G. Oaten, N. Taylor, A.R. Thomas

Officers of the Club

Honorary Secretary        A.R THOMAS, Allen’s House, Nine Barrows Lane, Priddy, Wells Somerset. Tel: PRIDDY 269

Honorary Treasurer         B. WILTON, 27 Venus Lane, Clutton, Nr. Bristol.

Caving Secretary            A. NICHOLLS, (Acting)

Climbing Secretary         G. OATEN, Address to follow.

Hut Warden                   N. TAYLOR, Whiddons, Chilcote, Somerset.  Tele : WELLS 72338

Belfry Engineer              M. BISHOP,  Address to follow. Tele : PRIDDY 370

Tacklemaster                 G. WILTON-JONES, 17 Monkham’s Drive, Watton, Thetford, Norfolk

B.B. Editor                    S.J. COLLINS, Lavender Cottage, Bishops Sutton, Nr. Bristol. Tel : CHEW MAGNA 2915

Honorary Librarian          D.J IRWIN, Townsend Cottage, Townsend, Priddy, Wells Som.  Tel : PRIDDY 369

Publications Editor         D.J IRWIN  As above

B.B. Postal                   Brenda. WILTON  Address as above